when it is completed, has completed, is complete?

Discussion in 'English Only' started by Andy1, Jun 9, 2006.

  1. Andy1 Junior Member

    Bretagne,France
    English speaker - Ireland
    Hi everyone,
    This is from an IT document. Which one sounds/reads the best for you?
    The system will reboot when the installation is completed
    The system will reboot when the installation has completed
    The system will reboot when the installation is complete
    The first is a bit "hairy" I think.
     
  2. dauda98 Senior Member

    United States
    The third sentence. But I like once more then when.
     
  3. Andy1 Junior Member

    Bretagne,France
    English speaker - Ireland
    Good one - cheers!
     
  4. FiFi JC New Member

    English England
    I would say,because you don't specify when.
    "The system will reboot when the installation is complete"

    You would say " has completed " if you specified when eg:
    "The system will reboot on Wednesday when the installation has completed"

    Yes the first one is a bit hairy!! ;)
     
  5. Joelline

    Joelline Senior Member

    USA (W. Pennsylvania)
    American English
    Hello Andy1,

    I prefer "The system will reboot after the installation is complete."
     
  6. Belle De Jour New Member

    English and Canada
    I agree---or "After the installation is complete the system will reboot"
     
  7. TommyGun Senior Member

    Hi everyone,

    A program has been being installed on a system, and now the installation is finished and the program alerts a success message.
    Which message for such a case would fit better?

    The installation is completed.
    The installation has completed.
    The installation is complete.
     
  8. Elwintee Senior Member

    London England
    England English
    Surely the verb 'to complete' is transitive (Something/somebody completes something). If you want to use that verb, then grammatically it should read "when the installation has been completed". In my view, it is better still to say "when installation has finished".
     
    Last edited: Jun 9, 2012
  9. Andygc

    Andygc Senior Member

    Devon
    British English
    Elwintee, I don't understand your response - the question refers to three possible completion messages.

    TommyGun

    The installation is completed. :cross:
    The installation has completed. :cross:
    The installation is complete. :tick: (where complete is an adjective, not a verb)
     
    Last edited: Jun 9, 2012
  10. TommyGun Senior Member

    Andygc, why the first two are wrong?

    I am concerned, because in this thread http://forum.wordreference.com/showthread.php?t=615805 they say these sentences are both right and have the same meaning.
     
  11. Elwintee Senior Member

    London England
    England English
    An installation can be 'complete' - meaning (as stated in the other thread alluded to) 'whole, not missing any parts'. It can be finished, as in 'It has been completed'. In my view it is wrong grammatically to say "it has completed", as the word completed needs an object ("I have completed the installation / my dissertation").
     
  12. Andygc

    Andygc Senior Member

    Devon
    British English
    TommyGun, on reflection, I can remind myself that completed can be used as an adjective, meaning finished or made complete. I just never use it that way.

    In my previous post, change the :cross: to :thumbsdown:, because the only version I would be happy to use would be the third one. The others are not actually wrong, but it seems to me that both Elwintee and I do not like them.
     
  13. PaulQ

    PaulQ Senior Member

    UK
    English - England
    A program has been being installed on a system, and now the installation is finished.

    The main problem that I find with the example is that "completed" is not what I would expect to see.

    On its own, complete is not as informative as the normal user of a computer would want. Theses messages are akin to headlines and I would expect to read, "Installation completed successfully." or "[The] installation [has been] successful." or "[The] program [has been] installed successfully."

    On Windows(tm) you often see, "The installation has finished. Do you wish to <insert several choices>?"

    If you do use complete, then The installation is complete.
     
  14. Pertinax

    Pertinax Senior Member

    Queensland, Aust
    BrE->AuE
    The installation is completed.
    This uses "completed" as a past-participial adjective.

    The installation has completed.
    This uses "complete" as an intransitive verb like "finish" - a usage which is becoming more common. Traditionally it would be "has been completed".

    The installation is complete.
    This is potentially ambiguous because "complete" need not mean "completed". It might be "complete" in the sense that you have selected a full rather than a partial installation, while the installation itself is still taking place. Conversely, an installation can be finished but incomplete, in the sense perhaps that some modules are missing.

    I am happy with PaulQ's Installation completed (successfully), considered as a headline for "has been completed".
     
  15. TommyGun Senior Member

    Why not say in this way?
    I see that forum-members tend to choose "has been completed". Is there much difference between "has been completed" and "is completed"?
     
  16. owlman5

    owlman5 Senior Member

    Colorado
    English-US
    Not to me, Tommy Gun.
     
  17. Pertinax

    Pertinax Senior Member

    Queensland, Aust
    BrE->AuE
    In this context they do mean much the same. Completed (adjective) is the state that something is in after it has been completed (passive).
    However, completed is not very common as a predicative adjective - not nearly as common as complete.
     

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