Which is colder, chilled or cold?

Discussion in 'WR Thesaurus' started by Emilek, Feb 19, 2012.

  1. Emilek New Member

    English
    Which is colder, chilled or cold?
     
  2. kenn4eva New Member

    English - British
    I always find that it helps, in these situations, to try and find out which one makes you feel colder. Because, as far as I know there isn't a set definition for this. So try something like this.

    "Dorothy took in a breath, the chilled night air sending a shiver down her spine."

    Or does this do the trick a little better?

    "Dorothy took in a breath, the cold night air sending a shiver down her spine."

    For me, 'chilled' seems to work better, as it makes me think of something that's been cold for a while, it's more descriptive, and makes me think of something similar to a shiver, like the chill that can come when you're afraid or alone.
    So, in short, it seems to be down to opinion.
     
  3. The Prof

    The Prof Senior Member

    If something is "chilled", it has been made cold, so, as far as I am aware, there is no obvious difference. Neither word tells us the degree of coldness.

    I quite like Kenn4Eva's suggestion that you see which makes you feel colder. I've just tried it, and it worked for me - I'm not sure how well that will work for non-native speakers, though. (And welcome to the forum, Kenn4Eva) :)
     
  4. bondia

    bondia Senior Member

    Illes Balears
    English-England
    No, the degree of coldness remains a mystery. However, the fact that "chilled" suggests some applied process (for example chilling a bottle of wine) which to me sounds like a synonym for "cooled". Therefore, "cold", to me, is colder than "chilled".
    Oh dear, that doesn't sound very coherent..
     

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