1. The WordReference Forums have moved to new forum software. (Details)

Whoever destroys a soul, it is considered as if he destroyed an entire world...

Discussion in 'עברית (Hebrew)' started by Ali2794, May 12, 2013.

  1. Ali2794 New Member

    Español
    Hi!
    I'm from Spain and I've be trying to get someone to translate this phrases, It's very important for me, so If someone of you know Hebrew, HELP ME!

    I will put the phrases in English are a famous phrases of Schindler's List


    English:
    1) Whoever destroys a soul, it is considered as if he destroyed an entire world. And whoever saves a life, it is considered as if he saved an entire world.

    2) who saves a life saves the world entire

    Thank you!
     
  2. airelibre

    airelibre Senior Member

    English - London
    The first of these phrases was originally in Hebrew, so it's less about translating it than finding the original.

    From the Mishna, Sanhedrin:
    כל המאבד נפש אחת, מעלים עליו כאילו איבד עולם מלא
    וכל המקיים נפש אחת, מעלים עליו כאילו קיים עולם מלא

    I think the second should be "he who saves one life saves the world entire", more or less, it's a shortening of the original.

    כל המציל נפש אחת כאילו הציל עולם מלא

    There are a few slight variations on this one but I think this version is fine.

    Do you need to know how to pronounce these?
     
  3. Tararam Senior Member

    Hebrew


    It is a verse from the Talmud, the first sentence you provided is the complete one, your second sentence is just a part of the bigger quote.

    כל המאבד נפש אחת, מעלים עליו כאילו איבד עולם מלא; וכל המקיים נפש אחת, מעלים עליו כאילו קיים עולם מלא.

    The bold section is your second phrase.


     
  4. Ali2794 New Member

    Español
    Thank you so much!
    No, it's no necessary
    I need the phrase because I want to tatto in my back
    Thank you so much again :)
     
  5. Tararam Senior Member

    Hebrew
    Note that just before the bold section there's the latter " ו " that looks like a vertical line.
    It's the Hebrew "and" or "y" (in Spanish), so be sure not to add it if you're only interested in the second part of the quote.
     
  6. Ali2794 New Member

    Español
    Thank you!
    I wanna tatto the second phrase
    Are you jew?
     

Share This Page