wine bowl

Discussion in 'English Only' started by monalisa!, Apr 9, 2013.

  1. monalisa! Senior Member

    Italia
    spanish
    Is a wine bowl only a bowl for wine bottle, or, can it refer to a wine glass?

    Thanks!
     
    Last edited: Apr 9, 2013
  2. owlman5

    owlman5 Senior Member

    Colorado
    English-US
    I don't think it can refer to a wine glass, monalisa!

    I sure wouldn't understand that you were drinking from a glass if you told me that you took a sip from a wine bowl. If you told me that, I would think that you were drinking from a bowl, not a glass.
     
  3. monalisa! Senior Member

    Italia
    spanish
    Last edited: Apr 9, 2013
  4. owlman5

    owlman5 Senior Member

    Colorado
    English-US
    You're welcome. I think I'd call that thing in the picture a "sugar dispenser". I sure wouldn't call it "a bowl".

    As long as a vessel served as a bowl, I'd call it a bowl even if it was square rather than round. It would have to have some depth, and it could not be tall like a cylinder. Sometimes a picture really is worth a thousand words. Here are some pictures of bowls that I found by using Google, picking "images", and typing in the word "bowl": bowls
     
  5. Copyright

    Copyright Senior Member

    Penang
    American English

    What are you thinking of when you say "wine bowl"?
     
  6. se16teddy

    se16teddy Senior Member

    London
    English - England
    Last edited: Apr 9, 2013
  7. monalisa! Senior Member

    Italia
    spanish
    Hi Copyright, I had deleted this part and made a new thread as I remembered you can't ask two questions in a thread. For some reason I did not succeed.
    The new thread has been deleted. Could you please confirm that under no circumstances such an object can be defined a "sugar bowl"?

    Thanks, I do regret the inconvenience
    :eek:
     
    Last edited by a moderator: Apr 9, 2013
  8. owlman5

    owlman5 Senior Member

    Colorado
    English-US
    I can't answer for Copyright, but I'd call that thing a "sugar dispenser". It would confuse your reader or listener if you called it a "sugar bowl".
     
    Last edited by a moderator: Apr 9, 2013
  9. monalisa! Senior Member

    Italia
    spanish
    That exactly what Copyright said, Thanks, owlman
    As to the wine bowl it is still used in Asiatic countries.
    As to the square vessel I think a wahing-up bowl must be square to fit in a sink!
     
  10. Copyright

    Copyright Senior Member

    Penang
    American English
    In the now-deleted-by-me thread, I also said "sugar dispenser" -- it is designed to dispense a certain portion of sugar with each use.
     
  11. Copyright

    Copyright Senior Member

    Penang
    American English
    I would call a non-round washing-up container a basin, not a bowl.
     
  12. owlman5

    owlman5 Senior Member

    Colorado
    English-US
    I would too.
     
  13. monalisa! Senior Member

    Italia
    spanish
  14. owlman5

    owlman5 Senior Member

    Colorado
    English-US
    Thanks for the pictures, monalisa! I'd call most of those things "basins", not "bowls". I generally reserve "bowl" to describe vessels that people eat something from. If the containers are fairly large and are not used to eat from, then other words such as "basin" or "container" are probably better than "bowl".
     
  15. Copyright

    Copyright Senior Member

    Penang
    American English
    One exception to owlman's "eat from" guideline (which I generally agree with) is food-preparation bowls: salad bowls or mixing bowls, for example.
     
  16. monalisa! Senior Member

    Italia
    spanish
    Could we add a flower bowl?
     
    Last edited: Apr 9, 2013
  17. Copyright

    Copyright Senior Member

    Penang
    American English
    In the right shape, a flower bowl would be fine.
     
  18. Keith Bradford

    Keith Bradford Senior Member

    Brittany, NW France
    English (Midlands UK)
    Only yesterday I saw on a BBC antiques programme, the sale of a set of champagne bowls. In my book these should be shallow drinking-glasses in contrast to the equally traditional champagne flute.

    However, the items on the programme were deeper, hemispherical, with a stem and foot, like a wide-mouthed brandy glass. I don't have any problem with them being called wine bowls (though in all honesty I'd have used them as sundae dishes).
     
    Last edited: Apr 9, 2013
  19. monalisa! Senior Member

    Italia
    spanish
    like this?
    http://myhome.bormioliroccocasa.it/it/products/executive/executive-champagne-saucer-stw.html
    http://www.chapaki.com/foto-zoom-e-prezzi-coppa-da-champagne-cheers-di-di-leonardo.html
     
  20. Keith Bradford

    Keith Bradford Senior Member

    Brittany, NW France
    English (Midlands UK)


  21. Are you thinking of a punch bowl?

    Rover
     
  22. Loob

    Loob Senior Member

    English UK
    Round or square, it's a washing-up bowl to me:).
     
  23. monalisa! Senior Member

    Italia
    spanish
  24. Keith Bradford

    Keith Bradford Senior Member

    Brittany, NW France
    English (Midlands UK)
    That's what the antiques expert said. Who am I to argue?
     
  25. monalisa! Senior Member

    Italia
    spanish
    Last edited: Apr 9, 2013
  26. purpleannex Senior Member

    North Essex/Suffolk border
    British English
    That's because you have "US" after your native language.

    In Britain, the washing up bowl goes inside the basin, more commonly referred to as a sink. The kitchen sink.

    So as ever with this forum, Monalisa! needs to decide if she want's to speak BE or AE! :)

    To me a wine bowl refers to a shallow, wide (maybe twice the normal diameter of a cup), handle and stemless cup, that you drink wine from, like this:

    http://p2.la-img.com/1392/34998/14424470_1_m.jpg
     
  27. monalisa! Senior Member

    Italia
    spanish
    Definitely BE!!, I said that a washing-up bowl must fit into a sink!,that is the logical explanation of the exception, I suppose
     
    Last edited: Apr 9, 2013
  28. Keith Bradford

    Keith Bradford Senior Member

    Brittany, NW France
    English (Midlands UK)
    I think "punch bowl" is a special case.

    This is because wines are served typically from bottles or carafes, whereas punch (from the sanskrit panch = five) has five ingredients which are mixed together in, and served from, a large bowl. To make the distinction between that and the smaller thing that you drink it out of, I would always talk of (a) a punch bowl and (b) punch glasses, whatever the shape of the latter.

    But no doubt other views will differ.

    Monalisa's http://www.wheelandbarrow.com.au/PUNCH-BOWL-Springtime-3L/ has the great disadvantage that there's no indication of its size. Is it the large mixing-vessel (bowl) or the small drinking-vessel (glass)? Given the high price, I very much hope it's the big one!
     
  29. PaulQ

    PaulQ Senior Member

    UK
    English - England
    In BE, I would agree. a basin is usually fixed to the wall, made of ceramic material or steel and has taps on it.

    As far as bowls are concerned, they can be any shape. Here are some square bowls The essence of a bowl is that its diameter will measure significantly more than the height; a bowl will be capable of containing something and the top is always open.
     
  30. Copyright

    Copyright Senior Member

    Penang
    American English
    Those look a little inelegant for champagne for me, but I suppose they're burly versions of the coupe/saucer. The two classic styles of stemware for champagne are the flute and the coupe, also known as a saucer, but I save that terminology for the cat's champagne glass.

    Here's a Wikipedia article on Champagne stemware -- I've linked directly to the coupe/saucer because we're discussing bowls, but you can scroll up to the beginning of the article.
     
  31. monalisa! Senior Member

    Italia
    spanish
    No, Paul, you used a qualifier for your search, I asked if it can be square without any qualifiers (such as...)
    If you add any qualifier, bowl takes the general meaning of vessel, I suppose
     
  32. PaulQ

    PaulQ Senior Member

    UK
    English - England
    Ah! There are two things here: (i) the concept of a bowl and (ii) a bowl as a material object. The general concept of a bowl is that it is circular and has a depth less than the measurement of its width. When we say something like, "The design that I want is a bowl" Here, we mean that the design should be "bowl-shaped". This is definitely circular, of any diameter at all, can contain something and has depth.

    However, "a bowl" as a material object, e.g. a fruit bowl, a rose bowl, a mixing bowl, a sweet bowl, etc, may be any shape. So, yes, a bowl may be various shapes but is generally understood as being circular.
     
  33. RM1(SS)

    RM1(SS) Senior Member

    Connecticut
    English - US (Midwest)
    Looks like a sundae dish to me!

    The bowls my family use look like this - definitely square, definitely bowls.

    I would call that sugar dispenser a "sugar caster."
     
  34. monalisa! Senior Member

    Italia
    spanish
    Hi, Keith, just for the record, you were right, they are officially on the market : http://atozpartyrentals.biz/rentals/glassware-rentals/
     

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