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"with effect from" or "with effective from"?

Discussion in 'English Only' started by evergreen_ivy, Feb 25, 2011.

  1. evergreen_ivy Junior Member

    Hong Kong
    Chinese
    Hi,
    I would like to check if the phrase should be "with effect from" or "with effective from".

    e.g. She will station in the Mainland office with effect / effective from 7 April 2011.

    I think it should be "with effect from" but the latter appears quite often. Do they have different meanings & usage or it is just a commond mistake?
     
  2. natkretep

    natkretep Moderato con anima

    Singapore
    English (Singapore/UK), basic Chinese
    • She will station be stationed in the Mainland office {with effect from/effective from} 7 April 2011.

    In other words you can say either with effect from or effective from.
     
  3. Parla Senior Member

    New York City
    English - US
    I think the way we'd usually say it in US English is:

    She will be stationed in the Mainland office effective 7 April 2011.
     
  4. evergreen_ivy Junior Member

    Hong Kong
    Chinese
    Thanks natkretep and Parla,
    so it seems that "with effective from" is a commond mistake. Thank you for correcting me :)

    And a question for "will be stationed".
    If "she" is the one who decided to move the office to Mainland (i.e. she is the boss), but not assigned by anyone. Do I still need to change it to passive?
     
  5. boozer Senior Member

    Bulgaria
    Bulgarian
    When you use the passive voice like this, it appears that her superiors will station her in Mainland. She may or may not be happy about it.

    If she took the decision and she is her own boss, you can say

    She will station herself in her Mainland office...

    But that sounds a bit funny :)
     
  6. natkretep

    natkretep Moderato con anima

    Singapore
    English (Singapore/UK), basic Chinese
    A bit? It's very funny sounding!!! :eek:

    Ivy, just say: She will be based in the Mainland office ...
     
  7. boozer Senior Member

    Bulgaria
    Bulgarian
    Agreed! :D

    I was working on the presumption that we must use the verb "station"...
     
  8. boozer Senior Member

    Bulgaria
    Bulgarian
    But, Nat, funny sounding or not, I did find something similar in the British National Corpus :) :

    Hamilton elected to station himself on the Queen Elizabeth, de Robeck's flagship.
     
  9. Cagey post mod

    California
    English - US
    That is a different meaning of station, I believe.

    I think he is going to be on the ship so that he can supervise operations from there. (It turned out that he couldn't.) He is not assigning himself an administrative position in a company.
     

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