With - Order position

Discussion in 'Spanish-English Grammar / Gramática Español-Inglés' started by irland5, Jul 27, 2013.

  1. irland5 Senior Member

    spain spanish
    Hi to everyone ,
    I have doubts about the position of the word `` with ´´ and I would like to know which ones are correct:

    ``Who are you talking on the phone with´´ or `` Who are you talking with on the phone´´

    `` The colleague with I have worked´´ or `` The colleague I have worked with´´ . I want to express in spanish : `` Los compañeros con los que he trabajado´´
    Thanks in advance
     
  2. Agró

    Agró Senior Member

    High Navarre
    Spanish-Navarre
    "The colleagues with I have worked":cross: (falta el pron. relativo: "The colleagues with whom I have worked")
    "The colleagues I have worked with":tick:

    Para el primer ejemplo me suenan bien ambas opciones, aunque yo usaría "to", no "with", y falta el interrogante.
     
  3. irland5 Senior Member

    spain spanish
    Hola,
    Muchas gracias.Sí , jajaja olvidé el interrogante :=)
     
  4. inib

    inib Senior Member

    La Rioja, Spain
    British English
    Estoy de acuerdo con Agró, pero prefiero "Who are you talking to on the phone?" a la versión con "to" al final.
     
  5. Biffo Senior Member

    England
    English - England
    I think that 'talking with' might be AE. Anyone care to confirm/deny?
     
  6. inib

    inib Senior Member

    La Rioja, Spain
    British English
    I think so too.
     
  7. Wandering JJ

    Wandering JJ Senior Member

    England
    British English
    It is.
     
  8. irland5 Senior Member

    spain spanish
    Hi,
    I have another similar doubt.
    Is it ok to ask : with who did you go to the cinema yesterday? or who did you go to the cinema with yesterday?
    Thanks a million
     
  9. Evelio123

    Evelio123 Junior Member

    Venezuela-Edo.Aragua
    Spanish-Venezolano
    LOOK, Americans just speak and write as they want like us... (xq?: porqué?), (t amo: te amo), so they can do the same... and when they talk just change the position!; obviolusly that's not usually or everydays english!, sometimes they do that and on grammar it is always wrong, but usually for american it's okay!, when i started to learn english via skype with american!, they just told me; OMG We're so glad you're in!, we had not could find someone to practice with!, so it is normal!, and you can use it too!, but with a good ears-sound, cuz' you can't say!, we wanna go Maria with!, it sounds bad!
     
    Last edited: Jul 29, 2013
  10. Biffo Senior Member

    England
    English - England
    I'm not sure if you think we are attacking Americans - we're not. We are just saying that there are differences between the two forms of English. For example they say "faucet" when British People say "tap".

    I believe there are differences between Spanish as spoken in Spain and Spanish as spoken in various Latin American countries.

    We are not saying anyone is wrong, we're simply making the necessary distinctions so that people can choose which version of English they wish to learn.
     
  11. pubman Senior Member

    I would say, "Who did you go to the cinema with yesterday?" or more formally "With whom did you go to the cinema yesterday?"
     
  12. Biffo Senior Member

    England
    English - England
    I would only say the first. The second is grammatically correct but I can't imagine saying it no matter how formal I was being. :)
     
  13. duvija

    duvija Senior Member

    Chicago
    Spanish - Uruguay
    Lets not forget to add the ever so popular 'Can I go with?' that seems to baffle more foreigners (like me).
     
  14. irland5 Senior Member

    spain spanish
    Ok thank you very much for all your answers!
     
  15. Golfmaster65 Senior Member

    English-United States
    How and why does this construction baffle non-native speakers?
     
  16. Wandering JJ

    Wandering JJ Senior Member

    England
    British English
    Come on - what is it with that statement that baffles a Lithuanian or a Latvian (sorry – cannot remember which; but they're geographically quite close)?
     
  17. duvija

    duvija Senior Member

    Chicago
    Spanish - Uruguay
    Well, if you think in Spanish, this sounds like nonsense.
     

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