with the opened window

Discussion in 'English Only' started by Akasaka, Jan 27, 2007.

  1. Akasaka Senior Member

    Japanese
    Hi members,

    If I say,
    I shouldn't have gone to bed with the opened window.
    Does it make sense to you. I know the correct way of saying this is, I shouldn't have gone to bed with the window open, but I am wondering if "with the opened window" mean something at all.

    Thanks in advance.
     
  2. elroy

    elroy Motley mod

    Urbana-Champaign, IL
    Am. English, Pal. Arabic (See profile)
    No, that is not correct.

    It sounds as if you meant that the open window shouldn't have gone to bed with you, which is obviously illogical.

    The structure "with + noun + adjective" is the correct way to describe a condition of a person or thing that accompanies a certain action or event.
     
  3. Akasaka Senior Member

    Japanese
    I see. It could mean something in theory. But that's nothing but nonsense.
     
  4. elroy

    elroy Motley mod

    Urbana-Champaign, IL
    Am. English, Pal. Arabic (See profile)
    Correct. With another noun-adjective pair, we could have a logical pair of sentences:

    I shouldn't have gone to bed with the girl crying.
    (I shouldn't have gone to bed while the girl was crying.)

    I shouldn't have gone to bed with the crying girl.
    (The crying girl and I shouldn't have gone to bed together.)
     

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