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Witness my hand this......

Discussion in 'Italian-English' started by lattecaffe, Dec 12, 2006.

  1. lattecaffe Senior Member

    italy
    Witness my hand this... (date)

    before signature in an official certificate.

    Maybe In fede... (date)?

    Help me please! :eek:
     
  2. GavinW Senior Member

    Italy
    British English
    As far as I know, it's "in fede", like you suggest. Witness here is a verb meaning "autenticare, vidimare, legalizzare", and the position and (specifically legal) context of the phrase "witness my hand (this)..." (where "this" does indeed refer to the date) is the same as that of "in fede".

    But a legal expert would be able to tell you more about the exact legal implications and status of each of the respective phrases. One of the mods currently online is a legal expert, I believe. You could always appeal to her!
     
  3. ElaineG

    ElaineG Senior Member

    Brooklyn NY
    USA/English
    It's just a legal formula that means: yes, this is my signature and I am signing it by my own hand [usually: on such and such a date].

    So, whatever the Italian equivalent formula for swearing that your signature is your own works for me.
     
  4. lattecaffe Senior Member

    italy
    Thank you Gavin! Thank you Elaine!

    You're very precious... :)
     
  5. lanave New Member

    Italy
    Italian - Italy
    Hi everybody,

    In a birth certificate I read "[FONT=&quot]Witness my[/FONT][FONT=&quot] [/FONT][FONT=&quot]hand and seal of said" ?

    [/FONT]Do you think it is the same as above?

    Thank you.


    [FONT=&quot]
    [/FONT]
     
  6. Vikorr Senior Member

    Australia, English
    Odd, I would have said :

    -"Witness my hand, <date>" would be used when someone wrote something up themselves (example, a will), and signed it; and

    -"Witnessed by my hand, <date>" would be used when someone has drawn (written) something up, but a second person has signed it (eg a Certificate)

    But ah well, maybe it’s an old convention. Some aspects of the legal convention has a long way to go to catch up with modern english.

    Means the same as the first quote, except that they've added a seal in - normally something done by government departments, or people in official positions.
     
  7. lanave New Member

    Italy
    Italian - Italy
    Thank you. I see what you mean.

    "Firmato e autenticato dal sottoscritto" is in my opinion the best way to translate that.
     

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