1. Pat le Mortel Junior Member

    Hello ! i'm looking for the meaning of this expression :

    "You can't say "nigger in the woodpile". It's racist"

    Thanks for helping !
    Pat
     
  2. SwissPete

    SwissPete Senior Member

    94044 USA
    Français (CH), AE (California)
    Google "nigger in the woodpile" and you will get the definition you are seeking.
     
  3. Pat le Mortel Junior Member

    thanks !
    Pat
     
  4. Cath.S.

    Cath.S. Senior Member

    Bretagne, France
    français de France
    Une embûche, ou, vu le niveau de langage, une couille dans le potage ?

    Évidemment, pour traduire ta phrase, je ne vois pas d'autre moyen que la substitution, sinon cela ne tient pas debout :
    On ne doit pas dire "il fait noir comme dans le trou du cul d'un nègre", c'est raciste.
     
  5. Pat le Mortel Junior Member

    Thanks !
    Pat
     
  6. Teafrog

    Teafrog Senior Member

    London
    UK English (& rusty French…)
    "il y a une couille dans le potage" , I love this and would like to slip it in (no pun intended :cool:) in a conversation, next time I hop over to France, just to see people's reactions :D. Did you make it up, Egueule, or is it a recognised idiom? Does it mean "a trap / snare" or "a fly in the ointment"?

    Back to the "… woodpile" idiom (something suspicious or wrong), which is not used nowadays, would the French expression "il y a anguille sous roche" mean the same thing? (Il y a quelque chose de caché dont on soupçonne l'existence) . If it is correct, we have "there is something fishy" which might mean the same as "… woodpile" :confused:
     
  7. Cath.S.

    Cath.S. Senior Member

    Bretagne, France
    français de France
    Hi Teafrog,
    I didn't make it up, I swear!:D It's quite a colorful and well-known expression (not to be used in front of everyonre, of course :))
    It means there's an (unexpected) problem, but your suggestion il y a anguile sous roche is mucho better! :thumbsup:
     
  8. Teafrog

    Teafrog Senior Member

    London
    UK English (& rusty French…)
    It looked to me as if it was freshly made up; thanks a lot for the clarification and explanation. I will definitely use it (can't wait) :D
     

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