word to describe possible reactions to [horror movies] humour: cold? repulsive?

Discussion in 'English Only' started by arzucan, Jan 16, 2011.

  1. arzucan

    arzucan New Member

    izmir
    Turkish
    Hello everybody
    Right now I am doing homework. It is about horror movies- genre of movies. As a turkish I firstly think turkishly of course and write in english but while I am writing I cant find any appropriate english word to a situation.

    << ... >>

    My sentence:

    Contrast to comedy topics, fear topics are international. I mean, while comedy elements are changeable according to its society; the fear elements are mostly same. For example a Scottish laugh at something funny, however an Indian finds it (....... )

    It could be cold, repulsive or... I just find them in the dictionary but I am not sure what english speaker people use a kind of word in this situation ?

    I cant find any apropriate word for there , Please help me! thanks
     
    Last edited: Jan 16, 2011
  2. coopr016 New Member

    English
    Perhaps the word you are looking for is "offensive"?
    If someone finds something offensive it makes them feel persecuted, upset and angry at the same time.
    For example, people with blonde hair might find jokes about blonde people being "stupid", very offensive.
    I hope this helps. Pease let me know if this is not what you were trying to say.
     
  3. arzucan

    arzucan New Member

    izmir
    Turkish
    Thanks , but 'offensive' related with insult or a kind of word that used when somebody try to protect himself when somebody say something bad to him , I think.
    For example There is a chinese in cinema, watching an english movie , all people in the cinema are laughing to a scene. The scene entertain (them) the english people but It makes no sense to him and he strangely look around and he just thinks '!why they are laughing I dont understand'. This doesnt make the chinese stupid. he does not laugh because of the cultural difference- because comedy elements are different. This scene is ..... for him
    ps: I use Chinese and English examples because of the diversity in general
     
  4. owlman5

    owlman5 Senior Member

    Colorado
    English-US
    Hello, Arzucan. You might try an adjective like "strange", "puzzling" or "incomprehensible". This will tell your reader that the audience member wasn't necessarily offended by the humor, but that he couldn't figure out why it was supposed to be funny.
     
  5. George French Senior Member

    English - UK
    arzucan

    You have told me a joke. I did not understand it at all.
    I would say "That joke left me cold."

    Thus you could use "The joke left the Indian cold."

    GF..

    PS.. Try this search string ""leave me cold" joke"
     
    Last edited: Jan 16, 2011
  6. Askalon Senior Member

    English (US)
    Maybe off-putting? You mentioned repulsive as one of the translations, which seems like it might be a bit stronger than what you're going for. Off-putting is milder, just kind of disliking something.
     
  7. coopr016 New Member

    English
    Oh, I see. In that case how about saying something like
    "The humour is alien to him" ? - this would imply that he doesn't understand why it's funny or that the humour is unfarmiliar. Or perhaps you could say that it was "puzzling" to him, as owlman5 suggested.
    A nice phrase to use would be "lost in translation". This would support the idea of culture difference. In context you could say "For example a Scottish person might laugh at something funny, however for an Indian, the humour might be lost in translation"
    I'm not sure there is an exact word for what you are trying to say however I believe that the latter expressions would fit.
    I hope that this has been in some way helpful.
     
  8. arzucan

    arzucan New Member

    izmir
    Turkish
    Thank you everbody:)
    I think off-putting is the right word because I have looked at dictionary it corresponds its turkish original word. with a one english word. Thank you Askalon

    'The joke left the Indian cold' should be a phrase that used in general thanks George French ,but off-putting is almost same meaning which I am searching.

    If Askalon did not find off-putting I would use ' puzzling' because "incomprehensible" is more offical word than puzzling I think

    So I am editting my sentence lastly : Contrast to comedy topics, fear topics are international. I mean, while comedy elements are changeable according to its society; the fear elements are mostly same. For example a Scottish laugh at something funny, however an Indian finds it off-putting

    Thank you :))
     
  9. Hermione Golightly Senior Member

    SW London
    British English
    Are we talking about reactions to horror movies as in the title, or different senses of humour, not finding something funny?

    Hermione
     
  10. arzucan

    arzucan New Member

    izmir
    Turkish
    You are totally right ' lost in translation' is best way and also explains my current situation :)
    The humour is alien to him, is a good sentence I am sure I will use all these things that people suggestes to me while I am compairing and contrasting between horror and comedy movies , thanks! =)
     
  11. arzucan

    arzucan New Member

    izmir
    Turkish

    Sorry It is not my fault, the topic name is changed by moderator. It was 'I need a appopriate word'
     
  12. Hermione Golightly Senior Member

    SW London
    British English
    But you have asked for words such as cold or repulsive to describe reactions to horror movies.
    HG
     
  13. arzucan, there is a key underlying question: Does the Indian person in your example understand the humor or not? I don't mean only in the strict sense of language but in the broader context of culture.

    ""Off-putting" contains the idea that the person is offended or annoyed by the humor. I don't think it works if the person has not understood the humor because to be offended by something one must understand (or at least believe one understands) it. The earlier suggestions of "puzzling" or "incomprehensible" work best if the person does not understand the comedy, either because he doesn't understand the words or because he misses the underlying cultural references.

    On the other hand, if you really do mean that the Indian person understood the humor but was offended by it, then "off-putting" is OK if the offense is mild, while "offensive" is the word to use if the person understands the humor but is quite bothered by it.
     
  14. Loob

    Loob Senior Member

    English UK
    Hello arzucan. I changed the title because "I need an appropriate word" is not precise or descriptive enough. I have now changed it again, since it is clear that you are asking about reactions to humour. Please, however, see a little edgy's request for further clarification.

    Apologies to everyone who was misled by the original title change.

    Loob
    (moderator)
     
  15. arzucan

    arzucan New Member

    izmir
    Turkish
    In fact, in my essay I am finding some clues from the movie the collector in order to show how a horror movie it is. and explain it with examples.. anyway ...however in one of my paragraph I have to compare the comedy and horror movie genres together. That is why I wrote Horror and ask about comedy genre term. I am sorry for the mistaken. I was searcing the right word and I wrote it with its turkish. but it was deleted because here is 'only english'. So a ambigutiy emerged between my intention and the topic, people did not understand what I am asking about horror or comedy, they are right. As Loob has already written why he changed my topic. It was uninteresting .It was my fault, so if I am wrong i am sorry again thank you for all people who cares about my topic!
     
  16. arzucan

    arzucan New Member

    izmir
    Turkish
    Ahh I understand what you mean. it was very small but very important detail. off-putting means compare the meaning what I am searching it in my own language. But I am not native speaker I do not trust the dictionary that is why I exemplify my question with a example. I dont mean the indian offended and annoyed with the humor. I mean ' understand' in so my sentence attributed to the directors how should they do while they are shooting international comedy movies. I also mean about cultural differences so I change it to puzzling right now, thanks :)

    I am sorry because lots of discussion was held :( But I have learnt a lot of phrase and expression which are not located in dictionaries directly
     
  17. owlman5

    owlman5 Senior Member

    Colorado
    English-US
    Don't worry, Arzucan. Loob is a good moderator, and I'm sure she didn't mind fixing your title. This was an interesting question. :) I'm glad you found an answer that works.
     
  18. arzucan

    arzucan New Member

    izmir
    Turkish
    Of course :) sometimes when you are talking with someone who speaks foreign language, and you can not find any appropriate word- you suddenly apply to your native language :p and want to tell it with acting. So It was me hehe
    I mostly suspicious while I am talking with someone in English language (as a common language). A language is not enough to understand each other- cultural background is necessity:( I always cope with this kind of interesting and minor details :( This forum is like deus ex machina for me !!! xD
     

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