Word with different spelling, but same sound? [homophone]

Discussion in 'English Only' started by JLanguage, Sep 27, 2005.

  1. JLanguage Senior Member

    Georgia, US
    USA: American English, Learning Hebrew and Spanish
    What is that called? It's on the tip my tongue, but I just can't recall the right word.

    Thanks,
    -Jonathan.
     
  2. mylam Senior Member

    Texas
    United States English
    They are called homonyms.
    pear-pair-pare, for example
     
  3. ggca Senior Member

    México - Español, Inglés
    They are called homophones.
     
  4. cuchuflete

    cuchuflete Senior Member

    Maine, EEUU
    EEUU-inglés
    Here to mediate the battle between Mylam, in the blue trunks, and GGCA, in the green and red trunks.

    We have two winners!!
     
  5. JLanguage Senior Member

    Georgia, US
    USA: American English, Learning Hebrew and Spanish


    From dictionary.com, originally from
    The American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fourth Edition
    Copyright © 2000 by Houghton Mifflin Company.
    Published by Houghton Mifflin Company. All rights reserved

    So the only difference is that homonyms often have the same spelliing, while homophones occasionally differ in spelling? To me it seems the difference between these two words is not maintained in actual usage.
     
  6. mylam Senior Member

    Texas
    United States English
    Well... it appears that the homonyms include both the homophones (sound the same, spelled differently and/or have different meanings), and homographs (same spelling, different meaning).
     
  7. ggca Senior Member

    México - Español, Inglés
    I got confused!

    Now I know the difference between homophones and homonyms
     
  8. foxfirebrand

    foxfirebrand Senior Member

    The Northern Rockies
    Southern AE greatly modified by a 1st-generation Scottish-American mother, and growing up abroad.
    I'll tell you the damn "difference"-- they're called homonyms. The other stuff is fuzzy growth that'll rub off with wear.

    Y'all are like 20 beagles fighting over one pale orange scrap of fur. And by the way, my cousin Reynardo wants his ear back.
     
  9. modgirl Senior Member

    USA English, French, Russian
    Most modern texts I've seen refer to them as homophones.
     
  10. foxfirebrand

    foxfirebrand Senior Member

    The Northern Rockies
    Southern AE greatly modified by a 1st-generation Scottish-American mother, and growing up abroad.
    Well, we'll see-- trends come and go.

    Just call me homophonophobic. Wait a minute, I'm not sure I like the sound of homonymphile either!
     
  11. cuchuflete

    cuchuflete Senior Member

    Maine, EEUU
    EEUU-inglés
    Hominy guys...come an git it. I expect harmoney during meals.
    On the grounds that FFB has prepared the way, I firmly declare that it's homonym, because my third grade teacher said so. No more arguments about the fashions of the time. Hemlines go up,down, up, down. It's homonym.
     

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