1. The WordReference Forums have moved to new forum software. (Details)

Would you be down with that?

Discussion in 'English Only' started by gjm0327, Aug 4, 2011.

  1. gjm0327 Junior Member

    This expression is from a text message on my friend's cell.

    "I'm going to hang with Juile and Derek tomorrow. Would you be down with that?"

    I figured that meant 'would you join us?', but I'd like to know what it exactly means.

    Thanks in advance! :)
     
  2. MuttQuad

    MuttQuad Senior Member

    New York, NY
    English - AmE
    I believe it is street slang for "would that be all right with you?"
     
  3. Alxmrphi Senior Member

    Reykjavík, Ísland
    UK English
    Yeah, it's "Is that okay with you (to join in/be with us)?"
    Also: Are you up for that?
     
  4. Glenfarclas Senior Member

    Chicago
    English (American)
    MuttQuad is right. Thus more context is needed to know exactly what is implied. If your friend had (for instance) promised earlier to come to a party at your house tomorrow, then this might mean "I'm going to hang with Juile and Derek tomorrow [instead of you]. Is that okay?" But if your friend has no reason to ask for your approval or disapproval of his plans with Juile and Derek, then he is presumably inviting you to join them.
     
  5. Parla Senior Member

    New York City
    English - US
    I agree with Glenfarclas. While the definition's clear (Is that okay with you?), it's ambiguous, as far as our knowledge goes, as to whether your friend has been invited to join that person, Julie, and Derek, or not.
     
  6. languageGuy Senior Member

    Kansas City, MO
    USA and English
    To me, 'would you be down for that?...' is an invitation to join , while 'would you be down with that?...' is requesting approval. In the example, it's difficult to know what is being approved - joining the group or allowing the group to go.
     
  7. AlexanderIII Senior Member

    Moscow
    Russian
    [FONT=&quot][/FONT] [FONT=&quot]Dear all,[/FONT]
    [FONT=&quot]Could you please help me out with a difficulty in the novel by[/FONT][FONT=&quot] Dennis Lehane 'Gone, Baby, Gone'?[/FONT][FONT=&quot][/FONT]
    [FONT=&quot] [/FONT]
    [FONT=&quot]“Yo, Patrick, how’s it hanging?” [/FONT]

    [FONT=&quot]“Not bad, Cheese. It’s a nice day.”[/FONT]
    [FONT=&quot]“I am fucking down with that, brother.” He brought his fist down on top of my own.[/FONT]
    [FONT=&quot] [/FONT]
    [FONT=&quot]It's a meeting of two former schoolfellows one of them is a private detective the other is a convict. The scene is jail. I suspect that the meaning of the phrase in question is 'I am greatly annoyed with the days like this (or days in general), I'm being got at with the days in prison. If I am wrong could you please render the sense of the phrase in an accessible form?[/FONT]
     
  8. Copyright

    Copyright Senior Member

    Penang
    American English
    It means, "I agree" (that it's a nice day). :)
     
  9. AlexanderIII Senior Member

    Moscow
    Russian
    Dear all,
    Could you please help me out with a difficulty in the novel by Dennis Lehane 'Gone, Baby, Gone'?

    “Heard you lost a bag of cash,” Broussard said.
    “You did?” Cheese rubbed his chin. “…Give it to my man Patrick, he’ll hold it for me till I get out.”
    “Aww, Cheese,” I [Patrick] said, “that’s touching.”
    “We down, brother, ’cause I know your shit’s straight.”

    It's a meeting of two former schoolfellows one of them is a private detective the other is a convict. The scene is jail.
    I guess 'We down, brother' means something like 'don't mention it'. Is this right? If not could you please teach me?
     
  10. Copyright

    Copyright Senior Member

    Penang
    American English
    Here, "We down" means "We're tight, we're together, we're connected, I trust you" (take your pick).
     
    Last edited: Apr 19, 2012
  11. AlexanderIII Senior Member

    Moscow
    Russian
    Thank you very much indeed, Copyright!
     
  12. AlexanderIII Senior Member

    Moscow
    Russian
    I see, thank you very much indeed, Copyrihgt!
     
  13. redgiant Senior Member

    Cantonese, Hong Kong
    Do you think "would you be down with that" and "would you be down for that" are not the same? I've dug up this thread about the difference between "fine with me" and "fine for me". I'd like to know if what mgarizona said could be applied in this case.

    "Would you be down for it" is a question seeking your opinions, not permission, as opposed to "would you be down with it", which is asking for your permission.

    In this case about same sex marriage, unless you're in government, a parliamentarian or some such who makes this kind of decision, is it better to use "would you be down for that"?
     
  14. Copyright

    Copyright Senior Member

    Penang
    American English
    I'll let someone else answer because I wouldn't use either one there -- both sound odd to me. :)
     

Share This Page