written language versus the spoken?

Discussion in 'Tagalog and Filipino Languages' started by turkjey5, Sep 26, 2012.

  1. turkjey5 Senior Member

    English - USA
    Hi,
    I have a general question regarding the written language versus the spoken. The written language, in particular the verb forms, seems almost impossibly complex and often times overlapping. Take for example the verb Sama. Listed below are 26 variations (in what my text calls the dependant form). It seems a Herculian task to try and come to grips with this one verb, let alone all the others. Do natives speakers simplify this system when they speak? I listen to TV shows and while I understand but a fraction of what they're saying, I don't seem to notice such complexity.
    Any help appreciated and thanks in advance!!


    Sama as a verb of motion:
    sumama
    magsama
    makasama
    makapagsama
    samahan
    isama

    Sama as mutual action verb:
    magsama
    magkasama
    magsamahan
    makasama
    kasamahin
    pagsamahan

    Sama with the pa and pag affixes:
    magpasama
    pasamahin
    mapasama
    pasamahan
    ipasama
    pagsamahin
    pagsamahan
    ipagsama

    Pakisama:
    makisama
    pakisamahan
    ipakisama

    sama-sama:
    magsama-sama
    magkasama-sama
    pagsama-sama
     
  2. DotterKat Moderator

    California, USA
    English (American)
    The key is not in mastering the conjugation of individual verbs, which will easily number in a few thousand if not more, but rather in mastering the affixes, the most common of which might number only a few hundred if you include the accompanying syllable reduplications in some forms. None of the sama variations in your list are uncommon at all, and can be heard in colloquial speech all the time.
    Once you master the use of Tagalog affixes, you will have mastered a huge chunk of Tagalog itself including not just verbal conjugation but nominal and adjectival modification as well.
    Try this experiment: drop the sama verb in your list and substitute another verb like kanta or an adjective like ganda, where applicable. If you know the proper application of the affixes, you will derive variations that you may never have encountered before but would nevertheless be correct (of course, there will be exceptions). The noun, verb and adjectival modifications of a word like bato will easily exceed a hundred by simply using affixes and syllable reduplications.
     

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