Wyższa Szkoła Ekonomiczno-Techniczna

Discussion in 'Polski (Polish)' started by agata88, Feb 19, 2013.

  1. agata88 Junior Member

    Warsaw
    polish
    anyone?:) czy wg Was może to być "Economic & Technical College"?
    Pozdrawiam!Cheers! :)
     
  2. LilianaB Senior Member

    US New York
    Lithuanian
    No, I don't think so. It depends where the school is and where the audience is. The Institute of Technology and Economics, The Academy of Technology and Economics, The Business Academy. There are many possibilities. The best way would be to see what the school uses in their international materials. Most universities have English names as well these days.
     
  3. agata88 Junior Member

    Warsaw
    polish
    Well, the problem is that this school doesn't exist anymore:( it wasn't very famous or prestigious. It was situated in some town close to Warsaw, the number of students wasn't high either...We were also thinking about "College of Economics and Technology"? Does it sound well ? I know I should have given more specific information about this place but maybe there is some kind of "universal" name?:)
     
  4. Thomas1

    Thomas1 Senior Member

    polszczyzna warszawska
  5. LilianaB Senior Member

    US New York
    Lithuanian
    I would advise against using the word college. It is used in American English as a name for many higher education institutions -- the same practically as universities, but if you are intending the translation for the EU, do not use it. College in England is something totally different -- it is more like a high school, or a vocational school. I would use academy or university.
     
  6. Ben Jamin Senior Member

    Norway
    Polish
  7. Thomas1

    Thomas1 Senior Member

    polszczyzna warszawska
    I haven't, but as you can see on the website I linked to this practice is common.
     
  8. LilianaB Senior Member

    US New York
    Lithuanian
    I would definitely use Academy. Business higher education institutions are often called academies. It could even just be called school -- without higher. For example "Harvard University School of Business".
     
  9. Ben Jamin Senior Member

    Norway
    Polish
    Yes, in Poland.
     
  10. Thomas1

    Thomas1 Senior Member

    polszczyzna warszawska
    I've seen Russians also use it.
    Anyway, it depends on what you want to achieve with your translation. If you want to keep the Polish flavour of the name, 'higher school' can do it. If you want to adapt it to an English-speaking country, you will have to do some research on what they usually use for names of such institutions.
     
  11. Ben Jamin Senior Member

    Norway
    Polish
    In my opinion "higher school" won't work in Anglophone countries.
     
  12. LilianaB Senior Member

    US New York
    Lithuanian
    No, you cannot use Higher School in English to refer to a University of any kind. You can say X University is a higher education institution, but you cannot really call it a higher school -- perhaps just a school in certain contexts.
     
  13. Thomas1

    Thomas1 Senior Member

    polszczyzna warszawska
    I know that you usually don't use 'higher school' in English-speaking countries in this context, but that was not the point and I think you're being too absolute, Liliana. 'Higher school' in the following name: could be translated with the wording 'szkoła wyższa' into Polish. Is the name of the school and its location a coincidence? I'm not so sure.

    Anyway, I think Ben Jamin is right here.

    I'd like to go back to the original question, here is something that may be useful:
    Economical and Technical College in Legionowo (Wyższa Szkoła Ekonomiczno-Techniczna w Legionowie)
    Source
     
  14. LilianaB Senior Member

    US New York
    Lithuanian
    I am not sure. I don't know all schools in England but most higher education institutions are called Universities in England. There something called "Higher School" in India --a 12 grade school -- like an elementary school and high school together.

    This particular school you mentioned is in Moscow, and may even be a word for word translation from Russian.
     
  15. Thomas1

    Thomas1 Senior Member

    polszczyzna warszawska
    That's exactly my train of thought, but still the British University accepted it. It's not to say that this name is universally used in GB, of course. Anyway, since the offical translation is different, it's not important now.
     
    Last edited: Feb 27, 2013
  16. Szkot Senior Member

    Edinburgh
    UK English
    I would go for Legionowo College of Economics and Technology. I am a bit doubtful about 'Economics' actually, probably 'Business' would be better. Definitely not 'economical' :).
     
  17. Thomas1

    Thomas1 Senior Member

    polszczyzna warszawska
    Hello, Szkot,

    That was actually my doubt too, and I even edited my post to mention that, but I started looking...
    I read a thread on 'economical' vs. 'economic' in the English only forum and the conclusion was that they are not the same; 'economical' isn't used to mean 'related to economics'. However, the dictionary of English at wordreference.com gives the following in one of the definitions for 'economical'
    If we follow the hyperlink, we find:
    economic /ˌiːkəˈnɒmɪk ˌɛkə-/ adj

    • of or relating to an economy, economics, or finance
    I got myself confused and thought my doubts were groundless. So your post is prompting me that maybe I wasn't that far off the mark. Are there any contexts in which 'economical' can be used to mean 'relating to an economy, economics'?
     
    Last edited: Feb 28, 2013
  18. LilianaB Senior Member

    US New York
    Lithuanian
    Is college a higher education institution in Great Britain, offering four year degrees? I always thought it was more like an associate degree school (equivalent to US associate degree -- not really a school offering a Bachelor's Degree or Master's). In the US you can do your PhD at a college, but not in England, I think. It is either more like a post secondary school, sometimes not even offering degrees or the building itself -- a part of a university.
     
    Last edited: Feb 28, 2013
  19. Szkot Senior Member

    Edinburgh
    UK English
  20. LilianaB Senior Member

    US New York
    Lithuanian
    Yes, I agree. It cannot be economic in this context -- either business or of economics.
     

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