1. The WordReference Forums have moved to new forum software. (Details)

year-and-a-half

Discussion in 'English Only' started by cholandesa, May 7, 2007.

  1. cholandesa Senior Member

    Cusco, Tawantinsuyu
    The Netherlands, Dutch
    A very quick question: Is a year-and-a-half written with hyphens like so, or without? (a year and a half)

    Thanks!
     
  2. srta chicken Senior Member

    California
    US English
    If it's used as an adjective, it has hyphens. otherwise, it does not.
     
  3. cholandesa Senior Member

    Cusco, Tawantinsuyu
    The Netherlands, Dutch
    Aha, that is an easy rule.

    So just to confirm that in my phrase it would be without: The courses last a year and a half.

    Is that right?
     
  4. srta chicken Senior Member

    California
    US English
    Yes it is!
     
  5. cholandesa Senior Member

    Cusco, Tawantinsuyu
    The Netherlands, Dutch
    Thank you very much, you´ve helped solve one of my long-time doubts!

    :)
     
  6. Packard

    Packard Senior Member

    USA, English
    Is that a rule? Hyphens = adjectives?

    A soon-to-be-married-but-still-footloose bachelor was chasing every pretty girl he saw, and his fiance was not too happy about it.

    I never heard the rule, and I am suspicious of all rules are regards to English. Most end up being just vague guidelines.
     
  7. antznyopantz New Member

    American English

    I don't know if it's a rule, but it is required at times grammatically. It makes sense with your example. It's not a "soon bachelor" or a "married bachelor" but requires all of your modifiers to be compounded to make sense.

    EX. A fat, orange cat. (The cat is fat. The cat is orange.)
    The long-winded responder. (I am neither long, nor winded, but I am long-winded at times.) :^)

    Hope that helps.
     
  8. Packard

    Packard Senior Member

    USA, English
    Got it. Hyphen for clarity.
     

Share This Page