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You are safe here.

Discussion in 'Tagalog and Filipino Languages' started by joe94117, Sep 2, 2013.

  1. joe94117 New Member

    French
    Hi,
    I would like to translate the sentence "You are safe" to Tagalog. I currently have this version "Ligtas ka dito" but it seems that it is the formal form to say it. I would like the familiar form that people would use with their friends and close family members. Could anyone help?

    Thanks in advance.

    J.
     
  2. DotterKat Moderator

    California, USA
    English (American)
    More context is needed to define the threat the person is facing. If there is potential for great physical harm and the person has taken refuge with you and you wish to assure this person using colloquial speech, you might say something like:

    Wag kang matakot, okey ka lang dito. (For contrast, a more formal way of expressing this would be: Huwag kang mabahala, ligtas ka dito.)

    If you are merely reassuring a worrisome person that things will turn out fine, that is, there is no immediate physical danger you might simply say:

    Okey ka lang!
     
  3. joe94117 New Member

    French
    Hi DotterKat,
    Thanks for your feedback. Here is the context: our organization is currently designing a poster which is intended to make sexually and gender nonconforming refugees and asylum seekers feel more comfortable discussing their issues and stories. On this poster, the sentence "You are safe here" is translated in many languages. Each sentence should be short and should use the familiar form. What would be the best way to day it in tagalog? Would "okey ka lang dito"or "Ligtas ka dito" work in this context? I don't think will will need to add "Don't be afraid" or "Don't worry" in the translation.
    Thanks
    Joe
     
  4. DotterKat Moderator

    California, USA
    English (American)
    In that case, the most direct text is the most desirable since you have to make room for other languages and probably a picture of a reassuring face. The one you suggested, "Ligtas ka dito", is the best choice -- it does not really skew as formal to the same degree that "Okey ka lang dito" skews informal. It would also be congruent to the translations in the other languages. In fact, since Taglish is such in common usage, you could also use "Safe ka dito," though that would not be my first choice.

    So, I think Ligtas ka dito is most appropriate for your poster. Reserve the truly colloquial forms such as 'wag kang matakot, okey ka lang dito, sa atin-atin lang ito, etc. to build rapport in actual spoken conversation.
     
  5. joe94117 New Member

    French
    Thanks DotterKat, for being responsive and give helpful explanation!
    Cheers,
    Joe
     
  6. françanglish Junior Member

    English (Canada), Tagalog
    Ligtas ka dito fait du sens. Mais, soyez avisé qu'on peut dire Ligtas ka rito aussi car si un mot commence par la lettre D et ce mot suit une voyelle, on souvent remplace la D par la lettre R. Mais cette regle n'est pas toujours strictement appliquée.
     
  7. latchiloya Junior Member

    Filipino
    factual. "Liaison" is the word for that.^^
     
  8. mataripis Senior Member

    Wag kang mabahala/ mag alala. Ligtas ka dito.
     
  9. DotterKat Moderator

    California, USA
    English (American)
    Originally Posted by françanglish
    Ligtas ka dito fait du sens. Mais, soyez avisé qu'on peut dire Ligtas ka rito aussi car si un mot commence par la lettre D et ce mot suit une voyelle, on souvent remplace la D par la lettre R. Mais cette regle n'est pas toujours strictement appliquée.

    This is not a liaison, it is merely a letter change. An orthographic or phonetic liaison, as frequently seen in French has no true equivalent in Tagalog of which I am aware. Written and spoken Tagalog has plenty of elisions (tayo ay = tayo'y, sila ay = sila'y, etc.) but no liaison in the sense of vowel suppression at the end of a word.
    It could be that you were thinking of the mellifluous speech of a makata orating or reciting a poem, but even in that case it is simply mellifluous speech and not liaisons that one hears (and usually plenty of elisions, by the way).
     
  10. epistolario

    epistolario Senior Member

    Philippines
    Tagalog
    In my humble opinion, "Ligtas ka rito" sounds better if that is the translation that you want to use.
     
  11. latchiloya Junior Member

    Filipino
    My apology. Liaison should not be a word, nor factual ^^
    .
    I miss to verify things before posting. .what I meant is, if not "euphony", it certainly is "assimilation". It is a phonological change or process by which a sound(of a morpheme or a letter) becomes more alike to another or nearest sound

    hope that is justified.^^
     

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