1. The WordReference Forums have moved to new forum software. (Details)

You are the same age as me / as mine / as I am

Discussion in 'English Only' started by claude23, Jan 22, 2006.

  1. claude23 Senior Member

    normandy
    FRANCE
    Good evening,


    You are the same age as me or as mine?

    Thank you,

    Claude.
     
  2. elroy

    elroy Motley mod

    Urbana-Champaign, IL
    Am. English, Pal. Arabic (See profile)
    You are the same age as me.
    Your age is the same as mine.
     
  3. jdenson

    jdenson Senior Member

    Houston, Texas
    USA / English
    You are the same age as I am.
    We are the same age.
     
  4. blancalaw

    blancalaw Senior Member

    Detroit, Michigan
    USA, English
    You can also say,

    You are as old as I am.
     
  5. elroy

    elroy Motley mod

    Urbana-Champaign, IL
    Am. English, Pal. Arabic (See profile)
    I guess I should clarify that "you are the same age as me" is colloquial. Strictly speaking, "me" should be "I" in standard English (as in Jdenson's post).
     
  6. sunnyweather Senior Member

    Polish
    How about this sentence then: She's in / at the same age as me. (?)
    Thank you.
     
  7. entangledbank

    entangledbank Senior Member

    London
    English - South-East England
    Not 'in', which is not used with ages. We do say she is in the same year as me, which means a year at school or university: grade 6, or first year, for example. (She might not be in the same class as me, if there are classes 6a, 6b, and 6c, but we are both in one of those grade-6 classes. Likewise, at university she might do maths and I do history, so we aren't in the same classes, but we are in the same year if we both started in 2011.) She is in the same age group as me: an age group might be 20-29 or 30-39 or over 70, for example, not necessarily a single year.

    Not 'at' either, though we can sometimes use 'at' with ages. A child or teenager is at a difficult age: at this time of its life, things are difficult. But that 'age' doesn't necessarily mean an exact age like 13. We can say 'at my age' - if I'm old, perhaps; again it doesn't have to mean an exact age/year. We talk of being at an age in the past: Mozart died at the age of 35.

    But in your example sentence, we don't say either: we say she's the same age as me. ('Me' is just as correct as 'I', and I think it's better, but that's a different question.)
     
  8. sunnyweather Senior Member

    Polish
    Thank you very much, entangledbank. :)
     
  9. se16teddy

    se16teddy Senior Member

    London
    English - England
    Going back to the original question: Are you the same age as me? means Are you the same age as I am? Are you the same age as mine means Are you the same age as my child, children, cat, cats, company, companies, or whatever other subject is under discussion.
     
  10. ALEX1981X Senior Member

    Italian
    Sorry guys I'm a bit puzzled

    Is this acceptable/colloquial/used but not correct ?? you are the same age as me :confused:
    Am I right ??

    Shouldn't the above be : you are the same age as I ...or.... you are the same age as I am

    Am I right ??

    In similar situations I often heard something like : I am the same age as he

    Can somebody confirm this point ??

    Thanks guys :)
     
  11. PaulQ

    PaulQ Senior Member

    UK
    English - England
    You are correct.
    You are correct, but the former sounds quite formal
    I cannot confirm what you have heard, but I have heard that too, and it is correct, yet I would expect to hear, "I am the same age as him." or "I am the same age as he is."

    Although the verb to be does take the nominative/subjective case, many speakers, by analogy with other verbs that take the accusative/objective case, tend to place the pronoun, where this is the final word, into the accusative/objective case.

    If you want to receive top marks in exams, use the nominative/subjective case, but, when entering the real world, be prepared to hear native speakers say the accusative/objective version. ;)
     
    Last edited: Jan 9, 2013
  12. Parla Senior Member

    New York City
    English - US
    I would use only the form "I'm the same age as he is."
     
  13. Andygc Senior Member

    Devon
    British English
    The normal English forms, in BE at least, are I am the same age as he is, I am the same age as him, he is the same age as I am, he is the same age as me. The grammatical rule that requires he is the same age as I, I am the same age as he is an artificial construct which does not reflect the actual use of the language.
     
  14. ALEX1981X Senior Member

    Italian
    Is this rule artificial or real ? I agree that the him/ me are used in the real world but, what's the rationale behind this aspect ??

    If one says : I am the same age as he (as he is) I think it is in response to : Who is the same age as he is ??

    Maybe - I am the same age as he - is just a truncated version of I am the same age as he is
    :cool:
     
  15. Andygc Senior Member

    Devon
    British English
    Artificial. If you read the earlier posts in this thread you will see some contributors who think it should be as he because it is a truncated version of as he is, and others are content that as him is correct. When my father went to school (in the 1920s) his teachers would certainly have taught him to use I am the same age as he. Now I think most well-educated speakers of BE would agree that as him is correct.
     
  16. JustKate

    JustKate Moderate Mod

    It's exactly the same case for speakers of AmE. "I am the same age as he" has been traditionally considered correct, and it's still correct now, but lots of educated speakers would routinely use "as him." I would use "as him" in every case unless I for some reason wanted to sound extremely formal and persnickety.
     
    Last edited: Jan 10, 2013
  17. se16teddy

    se16teddy Senior Member

    London
    English - England
    The rationale is that as is treated as a preposition. Other words that are similarly sometimes treated as a conjunction and sometimes as a preposition are than and like. If I may stray into mentioning a language other than English to illustrate the point: <<Please don't.>>
     
    Last edited: Jan 12, 2013
  18. bicontinental Senior Member

    U.S.A.
    English (US), Danish, bilingual
    'I'm the same age as he is' or 'he's my age'.

    Bic.
     
  19. Forero Senior Member

    Houston, Texas, USA
    USA English
    When am is omitted, I receives more emphasis and sounds awkward to most of us when stranded without the verb for which it is meant to be the subject. This does not make it accusative but disjunctive, and most of us prefer me rather than I as a disjunctive.

    He is less objectionable as a disjunctive, but it too sounds awkward to most of us. In fact, "as he" and "as him" both sound a little "off" to me. Plain "as he is" is a good alternative.
     
  20. xgll004 Senior Member

    Shanghai
    Chinese
    I also heard “someone is the same age with me” is it correct? thank you!

     
  21. pob14 Senior Member

    Central Illinois
    American English
    No.
     
  22. JustKate

    JustKate Moderate Mod

    I agree: No. It's not correct, and it's not idiomatic either.
     
  23. Forero Senior Member

    Houston, Texas, USA
    USA English
    I think the original question has to do with our use of be where have might be more logical. This meaning of be does not imply equivalence, and it does not work symmetrically:

    You are my age.:tick:
    My age is you.:cross:
    You are the same age I am.:tick:
    You are the same age that is me.:cross:

    The person has to be the subject, and the age has to be the complement. Otherwise, ages have to be compared to ages, and persons to persons:

    Speaking of ages, yours is the same as mine.:tick:
    Speaking of ages, you are the same as mine.:cross:
    You are the same as my age.:cross:

    At least informally, we have another alternative:

    You are my same age.:tick:

    This alternative follows the rule of person as subject and age as complement, but same seems a little redundant after my.
     
  24. dadane Senior Member

    New Zealand
    English (London/Essex)
    Another AE/BE dichotomy? I could say "you are my age", but "you are my same age", that sounds very strange to me.
     
  25. sdgraham

    sdgraham Senior Member

    Oregon, USA
    USA English
    "You are my same age" sounds odd to me as well, but since we're a rather large blob on the map of the world, it might be regional.
     
  26. JustKate

    JustKate Moderate Mod

    No, I don't think this is an AmE-BE difference because "You are my same age" sounds fine to me. I am more likely to say "You are my age," but the first just sounds to my ears like a more emphatic version.
     
    Last edited: Jul 31, 2013

Share This Page