You are welcome

Discussion in 'All Languages' started by fer7, Dec 30, 2007.

  1. fer7 Senior Member

    Andalusia
    Spanish - Spain
    I start with the languages I'm learning:
    English
    You're welcome

    Spanish
    You're welcome: De nada

    French
    You're welcome: De rien
     
  2. Bahane New Member

    İstanbul
    Türkiye / Turkish
    Turkish / Türkçe

    Yes: Evet
    No: Hayır
    Thank you: Teşekkür ederim
    Thank you very much: Çok teşekkür ederim
    You're welcome: Bir şey değil
     
  3. Consimmer Junior Member

    New Jersey, USA
    Malaysia, English and Malay Language
    Malay
    Yes: Ya
    No: Tidak or Bukan
    Thank you: Terima kasih
    Thank you very much: Terima kasih banyak-banyak
    You're welcome: Sama-sama
     
  4. Flaminius

    Flaminius coclea mod

    capita Iaponiae
    日本語 / japāniski / יפנית
  5. Lugubert Senior Member

    Göteborg
    Swedish
    It would have been easier if you had given detailed example situations. Swedish usage examples might include Ingen orsak!; För all del!; Ingenting att tacka för!; Håll till godo!; Väl bekomme!; and a slew of ironical variations.

    Personally, depending on the multilingualism of the other person, I have used OK! (Swedish: Åkej! and variations); Bitte!; De nada!; Pas d'problèmes! or more or less obscure local Swedish varieties.

    Some German varieties: Nichts zu danken!; Keine Ursache!, Bitte sehr!; Aber gerne!; (ironical) Von mir aus gerne!; Wenn's Ihnen Spass macht!. "Eben!"?

    Frank, what about Niets te danken!? Could I use "Goed so!"?
     
  6. Kraus Senior Member

    Italian, Italy
    Italian: prego, di niente
     
  7. sokol

    sokol Senior Member

    Vienna, Austria; raised in Upper Austria
    Austrian (as opposed to Australian)
    As for the German varieties, there are a lot that express the meaning of 'you are welcome - de nada' which differ in style, and some of them are only regional.

    The shortest and most neutral one I can think of is just 'Bitte!' (word-by-word 'please') - and this is very common here in Austria, probably the most common overall. The longer version 'Bitte sehr' too would be okay, of course.
    Keine Ursache/kein Problem' ('no trouble') would be considered more formal here in Austria but could be colloquial elsewhere.
    'Aber gerne' ('with pleasure') sounds a little bit strange to my ears, I'd consider this one more typical for Germany, if Austrian it would have to be 'aber gern'. However, more typical for Austria would be colloquial (dialect) 'gern gschehn' ('done with pleasure').

    There certainly are more possibilities, but especially ironic varieties I would not count here as 'you're welcome / de nada' surely is not meant ironic (and if one would count them in the list would become really a long one ...). I think that the above mentioned varieties cover the most important ones.
     
  8. Frank06

    Frank06 Senior Member

    Nederlands / Dutch (Belgium)
    Hi,

    In Dutch, we can say "Graag gedaan"
    (lit. graag: with pleasure - gedaan: done).

    In some situations, some people also say "Alstublieft".

    Groetjes,

    Frank
     
  9. fer7 Senior Member

    Andalusia
    Spanish - Spain
    Can I know the most used in German and in Swedish, please? Thank you Lugubert and Sokol.
     
  10. Alijsh Senior Member

    Tehran
    Persian - Iran
    Persian: khâhesh mikonam.
     
  11. Orreaga

    Orreaga Senior Member

    New Mexico
    USA; English
    There are many possibilities but perhaps the most frequent, or first learned (and least creative), are:

    Basque:
    ez horregatik

    Catalan:
    de res

    Hungarian:
    szívesen
     
  12. fer7 Senior Member

    Andalusia
    Spanish - Spain
    Hello! Could you tell me how to say "you're welcome" in Korean (with Korean caracters)? Thanks.
     
  13. sokol

    sokol Senior Member

    Vienna, Austria; raised in Upper Austria
    Austrian (as opposed to Australian)
    In Austria I'd say 'Bitte' as already mentioned above.

    But this may be different in Germany and Switzerland (and even there differ from region to region).
     
  14. fer7 Senior Member

    Andalusia
    Spanish - Spain
    OK, thank you.
     
  15. ulala_eu

    ulala_eu Senior Member

    Galicia
    Galician and Spanish (Spain)
    En portugués:
    A: Obrigada (gracias)
    B: Obrigada eu/ não faz mal/ de nada

    En gallego:
    A: Grazas (gracias)
    B: De nada/ de nazas (esta es informal, por copiar el "grazas")
     
  16. Flaminius

    Flaminius coclea mod

    capita Iaponiae
    日本語 / japāniski / יפנית
    "You are welcome" in Korean is;
    천만에요 (cheon maneyo).
     
  17. Lugubert Senior Member

    Göteborg
    Swedish
    I think the current thing among younger people is yet another one, "Det är lugnt" ('It is calm'). I guess I would use "Ingen orsak" ('No reason (to be overly thankful)') in most settings.
     
  18. Russian: пожалуйста, не за что.
    Irish Gaelic: Ta failte romhat.
     
  19. Outsider Senior Member

    Portuguese (Portugal)
    Also: Não tem de quê.
     
  20. knight_2004 Junior Member

    Arabic
    Arabic: عفوا (Afwan)
     
  21. Tatar: Rэhim itegez
     
  22. Hal1fax Junior Member

    Nova Scotia
    Canada, English
    Polish: Proszê
    or I suppose 'Nie ma za co' which means something more like 'it was nothing' or 'no problem'
     
  23. Nizo Senior Member

    In Esperanto: ne dankinde!
     
  24. Prince_of_Persia New Member

    Iran
    Iran
    Don't you think it was better to use " ghaabeli nadaasht" ??
    as you can see in French what you have said is "Merci" but "you're welcome" is "De rien"
     
  25. shannenms

    shannenms Senior Member

    Persian

    I don't think so, both are the same in Persian.
     
  26. OldAvatar Senior Member

    Bucharest
    Romanian
    In Romanian, there are several ways:

    Cu plăcere!
    - With pleasure!
    Pentru nimic! - For nothing!
    Pentru puţin! - For (such) a little (thing)!
    Nu ai/aveţi pentru ce! - You don't have what to thank for!
     
  27. Nu971

    Nu971 Junior Member

    ไม่เป็นไร (Mai Pen Rai) in Thai
     
  28. Consimmer Junior Member

    New Jersey, USA
    Malaysia, English and Malay Language
    Would the above depend on whether the speaker is a man or a woman?
     
  29. elroy

    elroy Motley mod

    Urbana-Champaign, IL
    Am. English, Pal. Arabic (See profile)
    Same correction:
    The letter ê does not exist in Polish. :)
    Nie ma za co is a literal translation of the French il n'y a pas de quoi or the Spanish no hay de qué. Very literally, it means there is no for what, i.e. there is nothing for which (to thank me).

    No problem would be nie ma problemu.
     
  30. Hal1fax Junior Member

    Nova Scotia
    Canada, English
    I am aware, I have a Polish keyboard and that letter came up when I tried to write 'e' z ogonkiem, I would not be giving translations if I didnt know the alphabet=/

    And in English, 'no problem', 'it was nothing', 'no need to thank me', it all means the exact same thing.
     
  31. 0stsee Senior Member

    Indonesian
    In Indonesian you can also say kembali (lit. back).
    But I prefer sama-sama (lit. same-same).
     
  32. elroy

    elroy Motley mod

    Urbana-Champaign, IL
    Am. English, Pal. Arabic (See profile)
    They may have a similar pragmatic function in this case, but they do not mean "the exact same thing." Anyway, my post was mostly intended to provide clarification. I apologize if you felt that I was undermining your contribution. :)
     
  33. Alevmanni Senior Member

    San Felipe
    Spanish - Chile
    Hello!
    How do I say it in Finnish? o_o
     
  34. Hakro

    Hakro Senior Member

    Helsinki, Finland
    Finnish - Finland
    Ole hyvä (singular) / olkaa hyvä (plural and polite form) (literally "be good")

    (Strange enough, we use the same phrase for "please".)

    Colloquially there are other possibilities:

    Kiitos kiittämästä (literally "thanks for thanking")
    Kiitos kiitos ("thanks thanks")
    Ei kestä (literally "it doesn't bear", meaning it's not worth thanking)
     
  35. Alevmanni Senior Member

    San Felipe
    Spanish - Chile
    Thank you Hakro!
     
  36. Hakro

    Hakro Senior Member

    Helsinki, Finland
    Finnish - Finland
    Ei kestä, Alevmanni!
     
  37. Johnny Milutinović

    Johnny Milutinović New Member

    Serbia
    Serbian
    In Serbia we say simply:
    Молим! (literally, I ask (for something) or Please! :))
     

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