You're gonna have to not do that.

Discussion in 'English Only' started by kaze_hikaru, May 3, 2013.

  1. kaze_hikaru Senior Member

    Korean
    spongebob)

    You're gonna have to not do that. Is this sentence grammartically right?
     
    Last edited: May 4, 2013
  2. Elwintee Senior Member

    London England
    England English
    What specifically do you have a doubt about, Kaze H.?
     
  3. kaze_hikaru Senior Member

    Korean
    I wonder the place of "not"!
     
  4. wandle

    wandle Senior Member

    London
    English - British
    I would avoid saying any such thing. 'Gonna' is enough to rule it out anyway.

    Either (a) it is something the other person is already doing, or (b) it is not.

    'For (a) I would say: 'You will have to stop doing that' or 'You are going to have to ...'
    For (b) I would say : 'You will have to avoid doing that' or 'You are going to have to ...'
     
  5. Beryl from Northallerton Moderator

    British English
    It this your own composition, kaze? (source)
     
    Last edited: May 3, 2013
  6. kaze_hikaru Senior Member

    Korean
    No, it's from Spongebob.
     
  7. Beryl from Northallerton Moderator

    British English
    >> You're gonna have to not do that.

    I think you'll find that most people would classify this as ungrammatical, or at best highly informal.

    I think wandle has given its most likely interpretations, and rendered them in standard English.

    You will have to refrain from doing that:

    (a): It will be imperative that you desist from doing that.

    (b): It will be imperative that you abstain from doing that.
     
  8. Elwintee Senior Member

    London England
    England English
    I think I would prefer a simpler form: "That is something you must not do." With that wording I think the future intention is understood.
     
  9. boozer Senior Member

    Bulgaria
    Bulgarian
    Kaze, you have already been shown better ways of expressing the idea and I agree with our friends who posted before me. However, I still say your sentence is fine, even if highly informal. It could actually sound funny in the right context. (Of course, 'gonna' is still something I would not write)
     
  10. wandle

    wandle Senior Member

    London
    English - British
    However, this version means that the obligation is a moral one and that it already exists at the time of speaking.
    It does embrace the future: but it fails to exclude the present.

    The original uses 'have to', not 'must': in other words it expresses a practical necessity only, not a moral one.
    The original says 'gonna have to', which means 'going to have to', which means that the practical necessity does not exist at the time of speaking, but will come to exist in the future: presumably the near future.

    Using correct written form, we can distinguish three elements in the original:
    'You are going to have to not do that'.

    This is equivalent to:
    'There will [soon] come a time when you are under a practical necessity not to do that.
     
    Last edited: May 4, 2013

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