You're welcome

Discussion in 'Ελληνικά (Greek)' started by ripple, Oct 21, 2007.

  1. ripple New Member

    indonesia
    Hi, anyone can help me translate this word in Greek?
    You're welcome

    thank you...
     
  2. Kevman Senior Member

    Phoenix, Arizona
    USA English
    Παρακαλώ (pa-ra-ka-)

    The same word also means "please."
     
  3. quirinus New Member

    Barcelona
    Català · Castellano · Italiano
    καλώς ήλθες (sg.) καλώς ήλθατε (pl.)

    /kalós ilthes/, /kalós ílthate/
     
  4. Kevman Senior Member

    Phoenix, Arizona
    USA English
    To clarify:

    Παρακαλώ means "you're welcome" as in what you respond to "thank you."

    Καλώς ήρθες (or ήλθες), etc., means "(you are) welcome [to a place]."

    I think we might need more information about which one you're looking for. :)
     
  5. Vagabond

    Vagabond Senior Member

    Actually. I will second Kevman's first post
    Now, "καλώς ήρθες" (etc) is "welcome" - eg: "Welcome to Greece!", only in that sense.

    *"You are welcome [to a place]" should be "είσαι ευπρόσδεκτος".


    *Question to Kev: You can't exclaim "You're welcome!" to a visitor, can you? I mean without adding the place?
    (I might be terribly, terribly wrong about this, so native English advice needed, before I confuse ripple beyond belief :D)
     
  6. Kevman Senior Member

    Phoenix, Arizona
    USA English
    You're right. :thumbsup: The isolated phrase "you're welcome" in English is pretty much exclusively used as a response to "thank you." When I saw the topic I automatically assumed this is the usage ripple was asking about. The words "you're welcome to..." may also be used (with about the same meaning) even before a "thank you" is involved, e.g.: You're welcome to read any of my books whenever you want.

    To welcome someone to a place you don't use the "you're" in English, but it does seem to be indicated in the Greek version so I can see where quirinus is coming from. ("Ευπρόσδεκτος" inerests me because I didn't even think about a literal adjective form.) At any rate:
    Welcome to Ohio! :tick:
    We welcome you to Ohio! :tick:
    Ohio welcomes you! :tick:
    but
    You're welcome to Ohio! :cross: (This means: "You are free (or allowed) to take Ohio!" :))
     

Share This Page