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zachować sekret o czymś/coś w sekrecie

Discussion in 'Polski (Polish)' started by Baltic Sea, Aug 29, 2012.

  1. Baltic Sea Senior Member

    Polish
    Hello dear users!

    I would like you to tell me how to say "zachować sekret o czymś/coś w sekrecie" in English?

    Should it be "to keep something a secret" or "to keep a secret about something"?

    zachować sekret o czymś/coś w sekrecieThis term is from a workmate of mine who wanted to know what is the English for "zachować sekret o czymś/coś w sekrecie".

    I would be grateful for a response from you.
     
  2. LilianaB Senior Member

    US New York
    Lithuanian
    Hi, Baltic Sea. Could you provide the whole sentence in which you would like to use it.
     
  3. Roy776

    Roy776 Senior Member

    Germany
    German & AmE
    The most common phrases are to keep something to oneself and to keep something (a) secret, so yeah, the first one is perfectly fine.

    PS:
    This is a question that should be posted in the English Only forum, not here.
     
  4. Baltic Sea Senior Member

    Polish
    Thank you. How about: This should not be revealed meaning this should be kept secret.
     
  5. Roy, why do think this should be posted in the English Only forum?

    Baltic, "This should not be revealed." is fine too, but without any context we can't tell you which one's better.
     
  6. Roy776

    Roy776 Senior Member

    Germany
    German & AmE
    Yeah, now that I think about it, the Polish forum's fine. I think not many people there are able to speak Polish. I just thought "yet another question about an English phrase". My bad :eek:
     
  7. dreamlike

    dreamlike Senior Member

    Poland
    Polish
    Well, as a matter of fact, this section of the forum aims at dealing with the questions pertaining to the use of the Polish language.
    That said, I think that asking for English translations of Polish phrases is within the scope of this section.

    As for the OP question, there's one more idiom - to keep something under one's hat. Although I like previous suggestions better.
     
  8. Baltic Sea Senior Member

    Polish
    Thank you all very much. Because we are dealing with Scandinavians for whom English is also a second language, I don't want to risk surprising them with English idioms.
     
  9. dreamlike

    dreamlike Senior Member

    Poland
    Polish
    And it's a good thing that you don't want to do that. Idioms are best used sparingly.
     
  10. Why?
    _________________________
     
  11. Baltic Sea Senior Member

    Polish
    If you are not a native speaker, you had better be careful with idioms.
     
  12. There is nothing wrong with being careful (even being a native speaker) but why should we use them sparingly?
     
  13. 涼宮

    涼宮 Senior Member

    Sbaeneg/Castellano (Venezuela)
    Like Maijlo, I too wonder why we should use them sparingly. Idioms reflect a more colorful, stylish, witty and playful way to use and speak a language, when used properly they are gracious. However, it may not be a good idea to use them in every single sentence, perhaps that is what Dream meant.

    That is easily fixed by reading a lot books, etc. It's perfectly possible to speak like a native speaker regarding the use of idioms, and sometimes, even better than them.
     
  14. dreamlike

    dreamlike Senior Member

    Poland
    Polish
    Yes, that's precisely what I meant - I see nothing wrong with using idioms every now and then, but it is phoney and pretensious to overuse them (by which I mean using them every second line, for instance), not to mention that it sounds hilarious. If one doesn't overdo them, they are fine.

    Besides, sometimes, straight-to-the-point language is better, and it is not uncommon even for native speakers to be unfamiliar with some idioms, what I've experienced first-hand.
     
  15. Ben Jamin Senior Member

    Norway
    Polish
    The important thing is to use idioms consciously, understanding in what population the idiom can be understood and appreciated. If you use an idiom that you are sure every English speaking person will understand then go on. But using for example New Zealand's idioms speaking to Singaporeans is a risky affair. Speaking to Japanese, better use no idioms at all.
     
  16. dreamlike

    dreamlike Senior Member

    Poland
    Polish
    I agree. I'd even go so far as to say that it's better to avoid idioms altogether when speaking to non-native speakers (whose grasp of English might be poor) from any country, so as to avoid any misundestanding.
     
    Last edited: Aug 31, 2012
  17. LilianaB Senior Member

    US New York
    Lithuanian
    Yes, I agree that they should be used with caution. In some interpreting environments the use of them is not even allowed -- the language has to be as neutral as possible for international audiences, at various seminars and conferences.
     

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