zagalopwac

Discussion in 'Polski (Polish)' started by wgalstin4, Apr 15, 2013.

  1. wgalstin4 Junior Member

    English - England
    Hi everyone,

    Trying to translate "zagalopwac", I think it might translate as something like "to go over the top" or "overdo it"

    Would these be the right translations or might I translate it some other way?

    Thanks,

    wgalstin4
     
  2. ChipMacShmon

    ChipMacShmon Senior Member

    j. polski
    As almost always it depends on context. I would normally translate it as: to go too far, but I can easily find situations in which your translations would be correct.

    By the way, it is: zagalopować się and not zagalopwac.
     
  3. wolfbm1 Senior Member

    Poland
    Polish
    PWN-OXFORD podaje taką definicję:
    zagalopować się pf - zagalopowywać się
    impf v refl. pot. to go too far przen.;
    zagalopował się, mówiąc to he overstepped the mark when he said it;
    zorientował się, że się zagalopował he realized he'd gone too far

    Synonimy:

    przebrać a. przekroczyć miarę pot. to overstep the mark a. line;

    przeholować pf - przeholowywać impf
    vi pot. (przesadzić) to overshoot the mark; przeholować w czymś to let sth get out of hand; on zawsze musi przeholować w żartach he always overdoes his jokes, his jokes are always over the top; nie przeholuj z piciem don't overdo the drink

    przeg|iąć pf - przeg|inać impf (przegnę, przegięła, przegięli - przeginam)
    vt
    2. pot. (przesadzić) to go over the top, to overdo it;
    przeginasz pałę/<strunę> w tych komplementach a. z tymi komplementami pot., pejor. you're going over the top with compliments;
    uważaj, nie przeginaj (pały) <struny>! (groźba) don't push your luck!; watch your step! pot.

    Rownież przesadzić to
    pojechać po bandzie = zbyt ostro potraktować kogoś
     
  4. Ben Jamin Senior Member

    Norway
    Polish
    I'd like to add that "zagalopować się" is used almost exclusively about a conversation, "to go too far" while saying something, usually praising something or boasting of something (or criticizing).
    The words "przebrać miarę", "przegiąć", "przeholować", are therefore not quite synonymous, as they are often used about actions, not only talking.

    "zagalopować" (perfective, non transitive) means simply "to fullfill a ride, galloping, to a certain place or point"
     
  5. LilianaB Senior Member

    US New York
    Lithuanian
    Yes, I agree. Although I think it can also be used when someone for example went too far -- passed a place he was going to, or made too many plans, or too ambitious plans, without thinking much -- something like that. Would you agree?
     
  6. Ben Jamin Senior Member

    Norway
    Polish
    The first meaning:
    Actually I would never use the word that way, and I have never heard anyone saying so.
    This said, I would add that the Polish language as used by the younger generation is often unrecognizable to me, so anything can be expected. Take for example use of "odskocznia" as a place of rest.

    The second meaning: maybe.
     
  7. dreamlike

    dreamlike Senior Member

    Poland
    Polish
    I'd be inclined to agree with Ben Jamin here.

    I don't think I've heard anyone use the word in such a literal way as the first meaning you propose. The second meaning sounds much more likely, and even familiar. Take the following dialogue:

    A: W pierwszym miesiącu działalności spodziewamy się zysków rzędu 300 tysięcy złotych, a w drugim planujemy dobić do miliona!
    B: No chyba się troszkę zagalopowałeś.

    Wgalstin4, could you supply us with the sentence in which you came across 'zagalopować?
     
  8. LilianaB Senior Member

    US New York
    Lithuanian
    I have heard many people use it this way -- I am just not sure if it it is still commonly used this way. ;)
     
  9. Thomas1

    Thomas1 Senior Member

    polszczyzna warszawska
    It is a legitimate meaning of 'zagalopować się' which has been around for a while. It isn't used very often in common parlance though.
     
  10. dreamlike

    dreamlike Senior Member

    Poland
    Polish
    That's curious, because the PWN dictionary indeed makes mention of that meaning, the only difference being it says 'to run too far' rather than 'to go too far'.

    http://sjp.pwn.pl/haslo.php?id=2542272

    I've never heard it, but then again I'm quite young. :D
     

Share This Page