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zegara tarcza

Discussion in 'Polski (Polish)' started by Sniegurochka, Feb 4, 2013.

  1. Sniegurochka

    Sniegurochka Senior Member

    Waco, Texas
    Russian
    Cześć,
    I am translating Anna Jantar's song "Tylko mnie poproś do tańca." What is " zegara tarcza"? Here are the lines:

    Tylko mnie poproś do tańca
    Dopóki młoda godzina
    Pożółknie zegara tarcza
    Zanim wybije mój czas


    I translated:
    Don't ask anyone else but me to dance,
    While it is still my time, while I am still around,
    May that chewed up cigarette turn all yellowish,
    Just as long as it is before my time is over.

    What exactly does it mean?
     
  2. PawelBierut Senior Member

    Polish - Poland
    The translation is: clock face.

    Zegara tarcza is not what you can usually hear. It is written in inverted order, (but it is a poetry).

    Normal way to say that is: cyferblat, tarcza zegarowa, tarcza zegara.
     
  3. PawelBierut Senior Member

    Polish - Poland
    The lyrics mean more or less:

    Just ask me to dance
    As long as the hour is still young
    The clock face will turn yellowish
    Before my time will come

    Edit: Your translation of the first verse can be OK. The meaning is ambiguous.
     
    Last edited: Feb 4, 2013
  4. LilianaB Senior Member

    US New York
    Lithuanian
    Yes, I agree with Pawel. This is more or less what the lyrics mean, if you don't need them to be performed, of course, because these would not fit the music. I would say: "When the hour is still young". It is really "The yellow face of the clock" --- nothing more, if you want to be precise (third line). "Before my time strikes", or better, perhaps, "before the clock strikes my hour"
     
  5. PawelBierut Senior Member

    Polish - Poland
    I can't agree. Pożółknie suggests that in the future face of the clock will change colour to yellow / have a yellowish hue.
     
    Last edited: Feb 4, 2013
  6. Thomas1

    Thomas1 Senior Member

    polszczyzna warszawska
    I agree with Pawel. Come to think of it, there are at least three possible interpretations of the verb 'pożółknąć':

    1. turn yellow(ish)
    2. gradually turn yellow(ish)
    3. partly turn yellow(ish)
    The first one is what we normally take it to mean. The other nuance is related to whether the colour is 'yellow' or 'yellowish'. In this case, I'd be inclined to understand it as 'yellowish'.
    I'd suggest 'Before my time comes' instead of 'Before my time will come', though.
     
  7. LilianaB Senior Member

    US New York
    Lithuanian
    No. It does have to be yellowish. It means literary that has turned yellow, but in poetry you can slightly play with words.
     
  8. Thomas1

    Thomas1 Senior Member

    polszczyzna warszawska
    Well, it does sound better to me this way too. However, in other situations it might not be so obvious, I think. If you're talking about leaves you can translate 'pożółknąć' as 'turn yellow' too.
     
  9. LilianaB Senior Member

    US New York
    Lithuanian
    I think your translation of the first line is right. The first line is not ambiguous if you listen how it was sung -- the stress and intonation. I think it only means that, in this song.
     

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