old english (anglo-saxon)

  1. Novac

    Old English: ēo, ēa

    Greetings! From what I know, "eo" and "ea" in Old English are diphthongs. That means that there is a smooth shift when pronouncing each vowel and, thus, the two belong in a single syllable (e.g. loud), as opposed to the case of a hiatus (e.g. naive). But, in the same time, I've seen that both...
  2. LMatt88

    Old English: Eadig

    Hello everybody. I was wondering.. what's the meaning behind the word "eadig"? I read it means happiness but doesn't "ead" refer to wealth? is it happiness due to being rich? Thanks in advance!
  3. LMatt88

    Old English: bregdan / bregan

    Hey guys. Question here, why does "bregan" mean "to frighten" if "bregdan" means "movement or change"? does bregd have both meanings? thanks!
  4. LMatt88

    Old English: Edwylm

    Hello everybody, I was wondering if any of you knows what this word means? I found the translation is surging fire but in some dictionaries it doesn't show up at all. Thanks in advance.
  5. D

    Old English: ond his þa æfæstan tungan gedeofanade singan

    "... ond his þa æfæstan tungan gedeofanade singan" This is a line from the Old English Bede. You can read the text (along with Modern English translation) for more context here: BEDE'S STORY OF CAEDMON There is also a link to the original Latin version on top of the page. Note: gedeofanade is...
  6. R

    Old English: Gæð a wyrd swa hio scel (pronunciation)

    Topic: Old English: Pronunciation of " Gæð a wyrd swa hio scel " Added by Cagey, moderator Hello, I know this isn't " real " english, this is old english I think, but I hope I'm not off-topic :oops: So, I'd like to know the pronunciation of this phrase, thank you very much, have a nice day :)
  7. C

    Old English: foran-hēafde/hēafod

    If I want to analyse a compound noun (concerning gender, case, number and declension) like foran-hēafde in Old English, which of the two nouns is the head noun?
  8. C

    Old English: miċel, mycel

    Hey all, I need to translate an Old English text into Present-Day English. I'm a German native speaker and I'm stuck with the following words. Does anybody mind helping me with the translation of the following words? Thank you so much. I might be recognize the categories of the following...
  9. C

    Old English: Ondranc

    Hey all, I need to translate an Old English text into Present-Day English. I'm a German native speaker and I'm stuck with the following words. Does anybody mind helping me with the translation of the following words? Thank you so much. I might be recognize the categories of the following...
  10. C

    Old English: Ōþrum, Ōðra

    Hey all, I need to translate an Old English text into Present-Day English. I'm a German native speaker and I'm stuck with the following words. Does anybody mind helping me with the translation of the following words? Thank you so much. I might be recognize the categories of the following...
  11. N

    Old English: sceaft / gesceaft

    In old english, what is the difference between these two words? In my textbook, it says that the "ge" prefix is used to make nouns from verbs, giving the example of "scippan" and "gesceaft" (create - creation), but the word "sceaft" seems to exist on its own, also meaning creation, so I'm...
  12. G

    Old English: The Sound of Rust

    Hello all! I was wondering how I would translate the phrase "the sound of rust" (as in, "I can hear the sound of rust," if a clearer example is needed) into Old English. I want to use it as a title for a blog. Thanks in advance!
  13. A

    Old English: The words transform and change over the years

    Hello everyone, I would like to translate this sentence in old english: The words transform and change over the years Thank you very much for your help.
  14. V

    Old English: Mischief

    Hi, I'm looking for the Old English word for mischief--not in the sense of real evil but in the sense of childish pranks and trouble. Is myrðu the word I want? And what verb goes with it: Does one make myrðe or do myrðe? Or a different verb? Thanks!
  15. H

    Old English: scip / scinan

    Hi, I need to know if in Old English words beginning with "sci" such as "scip" (ship) or "scinan" (shine) were pronounced /sk/ or /tʃ/. Can anyone help me? TIA
  16. T

    Old English: Panic

    Hello everyone. I am trying to get this quote turned to Old English to print on shirts, and want to make sure that everything is alright with the translation. The original quote is: "Fear and Panic in the Air, I want to be Free" after doing my best using the online translator i...
  17. M

    Old English: Watch the stars tonight, if I'm watching them too, then we'll be together

    Hello. Could you please help me translate a sentence to Old English? The sentence: Watch the stars tonight, if I'm watching them too, then we'll be together. My (wrong) translation: Waerda þā steorran tō niht, gif ic waerdie heom samod, eft wit willaþ bēon tōgædre. Thanks.
  18. T

    Old English: Will you marry me?

    This is my first post in this forums, so first of all, hi everybody I´m going to propose marriage to my girlfriend, and I´d like to do it using old english.. but i have no clue how to do that.. online translators have failed me (Too complicated, since i´m Spanish and old english has a lot of...
  19. E

    Old English: The impossible we do overnight

    Hi Anyone out there can help me? Old (7th century) ANGLO SAXON - anyone speak/write these? 'The impossilbe we do overnight; miracles take a bit longer' ('we' means 'you and I'. 'overnight' can be literal or a figure of speech. 'take a bit longer' = need a bit more time and effort. 'miracle'...
  20. E

    Old English: Þa sloh hine an heora mid anre æxe

    I don't know if anyone will be able to help me with this, because it is a question about Old English (ie. English as spoken between the 5th and 12th centuries). I'm trying to translate this sentence into present day English: Þa sloh hine an heora mid anre æxe I've somehow come up with: Then one...
  21. M

    Anglo-Saxon: Tips for learning

    Is anybody familiar with the language Anglo-Saxon? it's an old language and i just picked up the poem (well more of a book) called Beuwulf and it is written in Anglo-Saxon and is translated on the other page, like Page1: | Page 2: Anglo-Saxon | English i would be very much...
  22. C

    Irish/Scottish/Welsh/Anglo-saxon: Woman

    can anyone help me. im trying to find the word for woman in welsh. and also anglo saxon if anyone knows could you let me know as soon as possible. im doing a demo next week on England scotland ireland and wales and needed the word to woman in all 4 gaelic irish, gaelic scottish, welsh and anglo...
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