¡Hoy estoy espeso!

Syrianne

Senior Member
Spanish ( Madrid )
Hello, how can we say in English: "estar espeso"

I'm not in my best moment?

But, I think it doesn't give the same meaning, could you give me other options?
Thank you!
 
  • Syrianne

    Senior Member
    Spanish ( Madrid )
    Es que lo usamos así, dentro del contexto de que en ese momento o ese día hay algo que te cuesta hacer o decir.

    Me gustaría saber alguna expresión en inglés que exprese lo mismo. Se dice como algo que te está frustrando porque no eres capaz de hacerlo,
    y normalmente, cuando uno lo dice, el otro se ríe o le dice que no se preocupe, que ya le saldrá.
     
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    cbrena

    Senior Member
    español
    Sería mejor si nos dieras un ejemplo de una oración completa para que podamos ver cómo lo usas.
    Hoy no acierto una.
    Hoy no doy pie con bola.
    Hoy estoy espesa
    .
    Las tres son informales y equivalentes. Son formas jocosas de decir que hoy no es tu mejor día y que no eres capaz de decir nada congruente. Son informales pero no malsonantes.
    ¿Cuál es su equivalente en inglés?
     

    gengo

    Senior Member
    American English
    Ex.
    Ah, I must be dense today. (used for mental difficulties)
    I'm having a senior moment. (used by older people when they forget something)
     

    gengo

    Senior Member
    American English
    Hoy no acierto una.
    Hoy no doy pie con bola.
    Hoy estoy espesa
    .
    Las tres son informales y equivalentes. Son formas jocosas de decir que hoy no es tu mejor día y que no eres capaz de decir nada congruente. Son informales pero no malsonantes.
    ¿Cuál es su equivalente en inglés?

    Creo que el español es el original, y está pidiendo su equivalente en inglés. Si no me equivoco.
     

    Syrianne

    Senior Member
    Spanish ( Madrid )
    Yes, I think cbrena is trying to explain to you other ways of saying the same thing :)

    I liked the second one best! "I'm having a senior moment"

    But, could it be used by young people? it's ironic, right?

    Thanks
     

    cbrena

    Senior Member
    español
    Creo que el español es el original, y está pidiendo su equivalente en inglés. Si no me equivoco.
    Gracias, gengo. Yo también estaba pidiendo su equivalente en inglés. Intentaba dar el contexto que ya aportó SyrinneLaila.

    Me gusta "I must be dense today"es muy literal. ¿Transmite ironía sin sarcasmo? Tu segunda propuesta me gusta, pero no estoy segura de si se puede utilizar independientemente de tu edad.
     

    cbrena

    Senior Member
    español
    Sí, puede ser usado por cualquier persona, de cualquier edad, pero se usa más entre los ancianos (como yo).
    :D
    Bien, por mi edad, me quedo entonces con la segunda.

    Gracias Almighty egg. Creo que "dopey" equivale a nuestro "grogui". No es exactamente lo mismo que "estar espeso", pero es igual de coloquial.
     
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    gengo

    Senior Member
    American English
    Really? I've never heard anyone under 60 say they're having a senior moment.

    Well, it would be unusual, and would be funny because of the obvious contradiction in age. As I said, it's mostly used by older people, but I wouldn't be especially surprised to hear a young person say it as a joke.
     

    mijoch

    Banned
    British English
    "I'm not (quite) with it today."

    The BE/AE question enters here------I've never heard a BE speaker use "senior" in this way.

    M.
     
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    Almighty Egg

    Senior Member
    English (British)
    Actually, it's quite common in Britain these days. I first heard it from my own parents (both in their 70s).
    Fancy that, my parents teaching me "senior slang".

    Although, it seems to refer to specific events, like putting salt in your tea instead of sugar, or forgetting where you live.
    I'm not sure a senior moment can last all day. Not without resulting in serious injury.

    In that sense, it's a bit more like "tener un lapsus". It's related to dementia, obviously. It probably originates in politically correct language.

    I like the "not (quite) with it" option.

    Saludos.
     

    mijoch

    Banned
    British English
    Hi A E.

    I'm getting used to the fact that I've been in Spain long enough to miss out on some changes in British English. I'm used to hearing "senior" to refer to the old'uns in AE. In BE I think I've heard "senior citizen", but would find it daunting to refer to "my likes" as "seniors".
    Cheers.

    M.
     

    gengo

    Senior Member
    American English
    I'm getting used to the fact that I've been in Spain long enough to miss out on some changes in British English. I'm used to hearing "senior" to refer to the old'uns in AE. In BE I think I've heard "senior citizen", but would find it daunting to refer to "my likes" as "seniors".

    Mijoch, I'm just curious to know what you say (or used to say) in England for such things as "senior discount" and "senior center" (a place where senior citizens can go for recreation).

    And I agree with Almighty that "having a senior moment" refers only to a momentary lapse of memory or inability to grasp an idea, and not to a prolonged period.

    Another option for the original question would be "I'm having an off day."
     

    mijoch

    Banned
    British English
    Hi gengo.

    I think "senior" is a useful way of referring to old folk. As I say, I'm a bit out of touch with the changes in the UK´I think a used term is "old age pensioners/or just pensioners"----"OAPS". There's lots of reduced things for "OAPS", which are "retirement benefits". Pensioners often refer to themselves as "retired".

    Some local authorities set up "pensioners' centres", but I don't it's all over the UK. I'd say that many other European countries give their pensioners a better deal. Spain certainly does.

    So it's all a bit vague.

    Cheers

    M.
     

    runnernet

    Senior Member
    Spanish- Spain
    Mijoch, I'm just curious to know what you say (or used to say) in England for such things as "senior discount" and "senior center" (a place where senior citizens can go for recreation).

    And I agree with Almighty that "having a senior moment" refers only to a momentary lapse of memory or inability to grasp an idea, and not to a prolonged period.

    Another option for the original question would be "I'm having an off day."

    What about "my mind is a bit thick today"? Would that be correct?
     

    horsewishr

    Senior Member
    English (Generic Midwest Variety)
    thick
    /THik/
    adjective
    INFORMAL
    1. of low intelligence; stupid.
      "he's a bit thick"
      antonyms: clever


    dense
    /dens/
    adjective

    INFORMAL
    (of a person) stupid

    I don't see any reason not to translate it literally, if you're referring to your mental capacity. "Thick" and "dense" are both commonly used to mean mentally slow. It would be totally normal to say "I'm a bit thick/dense today." (Dense is probably more common, but thick is certainly used in this context."
     
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