¡Para, coño!

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February27

Member
Spanish
Buenos días, se que no es una expresión muy educada pero ¡Para, coño! se podría traducir como

"get a fucking stop"

Muchas gracias
 
  • jilar

    Senior Member
    Español
    Deberías exponer al menos una breve descripción de la situación para decir tal frase.

    Dicho esto, para mí ese "coño" no es más que un exabrupto equivalente por ejemplo al típico "shit" del inglés.

    De hecho, en la situación que yo tengo en mente, tanto me imagino que diga coño como joder. No cambia nada en el sentido final aunque sean dos palabras diferentes.

    Pero, como te decía, va a depender de ese contexto o situación que no has aportado.
     

    CVRreborn

    Senior Member
    English - England
    You really need to tell us the context to get a good answer like jilar has explained.

    "Stop, dammit!" sounds like something out of a Sherlock Holmes novel.
    :D:D

    I find that this "coño" or "joder" that comes at the end of an exclamation is quite hard to translate into English. As you said, "Stop, dammit!", although correct I guess, sounds strange. The most accurate translation I can think of is "Stop! Fucking hell..." but I don't think that "coño" or "joder" are as strong as that.
     

    LVRBC

    Senior Member
    English-US, standard and medical
    Stop, for fuck's sake - more vulgar
    Shit! Stop! - more accurate although the word order is changed. I change word order all the time in translation and don't find it a problem.
     

    gengo

    Senior Member
    American English
    Shit! Stop! - more accurate although the word order is changed.
    Changing the word order is what I was going to suggest, too. For some reason, it sounds more natural that way in English, even though I guess the Spanish order is more logical, since the important information is conveyed first.

    However, if a sufficiently long pause is included between the words, I see nothing wrong with using the Spanish order here: Stop! ... Shit!
     

    cidertree

    Senior Member
    English - Ireland
    :D:D

    I find that this "coño" or "joder" that comes at the end of an exclamation is quite hard to translate into English. As you said, "Stop, dammit!", although correct I guess, sounds strange. The most accurate translation I can think of is "Stop! Fucking hell..." but I don't think that "coño" or "joder" are as strong as that.
    I think "coño" is used mainly as an exclamation of frustration, exasperation or (mild) irritation - at least in the Canary Islands. "Stop, dammit" sounds correct in this context as does "Stop! Fucking hell..." but I've never taken "fucking Hell" as very aggressive or profane. A possibility could also be "just stop!" or, if one is seriously annoyed, "Just fucking stop!"
     

    LVRBC

    Senior Member
    English-US, standard and medical
    Or to preserve the word order:-

    Stop you bastard!

    I'd love to know the context though.
    I think it's important to avoid personal insult, although I agree that it is natural in that situation in US English. But it is absent from the original and significantly changes the tone.
     

    normaelena

    Senior Member
    USA Spanish
    "Coño" has to be the most used word in the Dominican Rep. It is profanity. I agree with cidertree, it is used mainly out of frustration, exasperation, irritation. However, a good news can also bring about a coño: "Coño, al fin gané la lotería". I agree with those that said Stop, dammit, but Stop, Goddammit! expresses a higher level of frustration.
     

    Cerros de Úbeda

    Senior Member
    UK
    Spanish - Spain (Galicia)
    - Eff off...!!
    - Fuck! Stop it!
    (= Fuck it! Stop...!)
    - Fuck off! (vul)

    - Stop it, (you)...!! (What) the fuck...?
    - Stoooop!! (Bloody hell...!?)


    - Hey!! Stop! / Stop it, now!!
    - Stop it!! man...
    - Get off (me)!! / (Just) Go away...!!
    - Let go of me! (You, idiot...?)
    - Shut up! / Shut it!
    (These two can sometimes be used to tell someone to 'leave one alone', rather than to 'be quiet')


    It's an interjection of frustration, telling someone to leave one alone, and I think it can be translated with any of the phrases of that meaning.

    The 'coño', which is another interjection, and just adds to the sense of emphasis or urgency, as well as a connotation of vulgarity. It can be left untranslated, or substituted by other words with an equivalent vulgar tone.

    I agree with Jilar on this;
    tanto me imagino que diga coño como joder. No cambia nada en el sentido final aunque sean dos palabras diferentes.

    What is key here, is the tone and emphasis of the iteration.
     
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