¿ Por qué lo habremos bautizado Claudio? (Future tense)

Malbecblend

Member
English
I learned that the future tense can be used to express probability or conjecture in PRESENT time. Thus, for example, ¿ Quién tendrá las llaves? = I wonder who has the keys.

In an article in News in Slow Spanish (May 21, 2019), there is a dialogue where they are reminiscing about cartoons they remember watching when they were young. The part of the dialogue I have a question about is the following:

María: Lo recuerdo perfectamente. Nosotros crecimos escuchando una voz doblada al español por actores mexicanos.En realidad, el personaje en inglés se llama Foghorn Leghorn y tiene un acento tejano.
Noé: Vaya, no me había puesto a pensar en eso.¡ No tengo idea de cómo suena en inglés! ¿ Y ese nombre? ¿ Por qué lo habremos bautizado Claudio?
María: Habrá sido una decisión de la compañía para el mercado latino.

Here it would appear that "lo habremos bautizado " and "habrá sido" involve conjecture/probability regarding the PAST. I.e., Why did we name him Claudio? It was probably the company's decision.

I also learned that for conjecture/probability regarding the PAST you can use the conditional tense. Example: ¿ Quién sería? = I wonder who that was?

So, I don't understand why the future tense, rather than the conditional tense, was used in the dialogue above.
 
  • Peterdg

    Senior Member
    Dutch - Belgium
    As far as I'm concerned: the "habremos" is strange. The "habrá sido" is not.

    About "habremos": the first person plural is strange (I would have expected 3rd person plural) and the tense is strange. I would have used "¿Por qué lo habrían bautizado Claudio?"

    It basically works as in English:

    Why would they have called him Claudio?

    But, as I said above, "habrá sido una decisión de ..." is perfectly normal. Also in English: "It will have been a company decision".
     

    Dosamuno

    Senior Member
    English, USA
    It's not the future tense. It'a the future perfect tense.
    In your examples, the translations would be "Why might (would) we have named him Claudio?";
    "It must have been the company's decision".

    If you have A New Reference Grammar of Modern Spanish, check out 14.11. (a)

    “The future perfect is very often used to express conjecture, or, in questions, mystification or perplexity. se lo habrá dicho Miguel ‘Miguel must have told him/her/you’, ¿dónde lo habra puesto? ‘where can she/he have put it?’ The negative expresses a conjecture or may make a statement rhetorical, i.e. it expects or hopes for the answer ‘of course not’: no lo habrán hecho ‘I guess they haven’t done it’ or ‘they can’t have done it’…
     
    Last edited:

    Amapolas

    Senior Member
    Castellano rioplatense
    As far as I'm concerned: the "habremos" is strange. The "habrá sido" is not.

    About "habremos": the first person plural is strange (I would have expected 3rd person plural) and the tense is strange. I would have used "¿Por qué lo habrían bautizado Claudio?"

    It basically works as in English:

    Why would they have called him Claudio?

    But, as I said above, "habrá sido una decisión de ..." is perfectly normal. Also in English: "It will have been a company decision".
    En realidad, se usa con todas las personas.
    Primera
    ¿Dónde habré metido las llaves? No las encuentro por ninguna parte.
    ¡Por qué se nos habrá ocurrido comprar esta casa? Sólo nos da problemas.
    Segunda
    No sé por qué lo habrás hecho, pero te mereces que te castiguen.
    Etc.
     

    Doraemon-

    Senior Member
    "Spanish - Spain" "Catalan - Valencia"
    As far as I'm concerned: the "habremos" is strange. The "habrá sido" is not.
    About "habremos": the first person plural is strange (I would have expected 3rd person plural) and the tense is strange. I would have used "¿Por qué lo habrían bautizado Claudio?"
    The use of first person plural is evident: this is said by the parents of Claudio. They can't be perplex, surprised... about some others who put that name, the speaker is one of those who baptised Claudio with that name, so the first person plural is the only logical one, in this case. It would be "habrán" if it's said by some other one who is perplex with the name. And the second person could be used if you say it to Claudio's parents.
    Dosamuno is right: the future perfect tense can be used to express probability or conjecture in PRESENT time, but not only probability and conjecture, also incredulity, perplexity...
     

    Marsianitoh

    Senior Member
    Spanish-Spain
    The use of first person plural is evident: this is said by the parents of Claudio. They can't be perplex, surprised... about some others who put that name, the speaker is one of those who baptised Claudio with that name, so the first person plural is the only logical one, in this case. It would be "habrán" if it's said by some other one who is perplex with the name. And the second person could be used if you say it to Claudio's parents.
    Dosamuno is right: the future perfect tense can be used to express probability or conjecture in PRESENT time, but not only probability and conjecture, also incredulity, perplexity...
    The "we" in " habremos bautizado" are not Claudio's parents ( they are talking about cartoons, about el gallo Claudio), it refers to all of us who watched this show dubbed in Spanish, the speaker is wondering why on earth we, Spanish speakers, ended up calling Foghorn Leghorn "Claudio", why that name.
    It's obvious that we didn't actually choose the name ( in that sense we didn't christen him) but we did accept to call him that, for us he became "Claudio", nobody knows the real name, so we are somehow responsible for the name.
    I don't think there's anything strange in the sentence. It's like saying : ¿ Por qué lo habremos bautizado Claudio (en los países de habla hispana)?
     
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    Doraemon-

    Senior Member
    "Spanish - Spain" "Catalan - Valencia"
    Ok, I missed the context, even if it is well explained, sorry.
    It's a first person plural referring to "us, the Spanish speakers".
     

    Malbecblend

    Member
    English
    As far as I'm concerned: the "habremos" is strange. The "habrá sido" is not.

    About "habremos": the first person plural is strange (I would have expected 3rd person plural) and the tense is strange. I would have used "¿Por qué lo habrían bautizado Claudio?"

    It basically works as in English:

    Why would they have called him Claudio?

    But, as I said above, "habrá sido una decisión de ..." is perfectly normal. Also in English: "It will have been a company decision".
    “It will have been a company decision” wouldn’t make sense in this context. The two people speaking here are reminiscing about the past. Here’s a possibility: I wonder if it might have been a company decision.
     
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