Österreichischer Dialekt: Buam, servus

Apus

Senior Member
Confederatio Helvetica French
Two questions, please:

Does Buam mean "boys", and is it a plural form ? If so, what is the singular form ?

Second question:

Why and since when do Austrians use servus for danke ?



(Antwort im Deutsch oder Englisch)
 
  • Jana337

    Senior Member
    čeština
    Apus said:
    Why and since when do Austrians use servus for danke ?

    (Antwort im Deutsch oder Englisch)

    Are you sure? I always hear that as a greeting (both hello and bye I think). This is the way our Austrian friend Gatoviejo used it in this forum.

    I believe that servus would be more logical for here you are or welcome. If I am not mistaken, it means I am your servant in Latin.

    Jana
     

    sohc4

    Senior Member
    Germany, German
    Apus said:
    Two questions, please:

    Does Buam mean "boys", and is it a plural form ? If so, what is the singular form ?

    Yes, "Buam" is the plural of "Bua", and it means "Boys" and "Boy", respectively.

    Ja, "Buam" ist die Mehrzahl von "Bua" und es bedeutet "Buben", "Jungen", "Knaben" beziehungsweise "Bub", "Junge", Knabe".

    Axl
     

    sohc4

    Senior Member
    Germany, German
    Jana337 said:
    Are you sure? I always hear that as a greeting (both hello and bye I think :tick:). This is the way our Austrian friend Gatoviejo used it in this forum.

    I believe that servus would be more logical for here you are or welcome. If I am not mistaken, it means I am your servant in Latin :tick:.

    Jana
    Jana is absolutely correct. By the way, both terms (Buam and servus) are not only used in Austria but also in Bavaria across the border.

    Other Austrian words which haven't made it into Bavaria are "Paradeiser" for "tomato" or "Deka" for "ten grams": "Ich hätt' gern 20 Deka Wurst".
     

    Jana337

    Senior Member
    čeština
    sohc4 said:
    Jana is absolutely correct. :cross:
    What Jana wrote is absolutely correct. :tick:
    Jana is absolutely right. :tick:

    Other Austrian words which haven't made it into Bavaria are "Paradeiser" for "tomato" or "Deka" for "ten grams": "Ich hätt' gern 20 Deka Wurst".

    Paradeiser is a term common in the Czech republic near the Austrian border. Normally, we use what could be called a literal translation of Paradeiser, more or less.

    Deka is a very common Czech word (strangely, I didn't notice that Austrians use it, too). I wonder who borrowed it from whom.

    Jana
     

    Apus

    Senior Member
    Confederatio Helvetica French
    Thanks Jana and sohc4. I was told by a German speaking teacher that servus meant "thanks" but I acknowledge Jana is right.

    Interesting that Paradeiser is used in Austria. I have some recollection that paradise (fruit) is also used in some other languages.
     

    sohc4

    Senior Member
    Germany, German
    whodunit said:
    Ich überlege noch immer, wo das Wort "Dradiwaberl" (naives Mädchen) herkommt und wie man auf dem Namen "Guckerschecken" (Sommersprossen) kommen kann.
    Who,

    I tried to find any clue, but no luck.

    BTW, there was or still is an Austrian rock band called "Drahdiwaberl", IIRC they had Falco playing bass guitar. They have even been on TV once, but raised so much havoc during the show they were never invited again :).

    Axl
     

    Whodunit

    Senior Member
    Deutschland ~ Deutsch/Sächsisch
    sohc4 said:
    Who,

    I tried to find any clue, but no luck.

    BTW, there was or still is an Austrian rock band called "Drahdiwaberl", IIRC they had Falco playing bass guitar. They have even been on TV once, but raised so much havoc during the show they were never invited again :).

    Axl

    Thanks. I'm sure I can remember having seen a propaganda or something like this anytime, but I thought it would have been a girl who calls herself "Dradiwaberl". What about "Abbrändler"? I'm sure there must be an English translation: burned people???
     

    sohc4

    Senior Member
    Germany, German
    whodunit said:
    Thanks. I'm sure I can remember having seen a propaganda or something like this anytime, but I thought it would have been a girl who calls herself "Dradiwaberl". What about "Abbrändler"? I'm sure there must be an English translation: burned people???
    Just my guessing from being a native Bavarian speaker:

    Dra(h)diwaberl: Dreh' dich, Mädchen (Turn, girl)

    Drah=Dreh'
    di=dich
    Waberl=Mädchen

    (Jana might probably know "Waberl" - I remember my mother (of Czech origin) referring to a girl as "Waberl")

    Drahdiwaberl (the band) has their ;) own website: www.drahdiwaberl.at

    An Abbrändler is a farmer who's farm burnt down. See here for a German definition.
    It might get translated as "burnt down person" perhaps.

    Axl
     

    Whodunit

    Senior Member
    Deutschland ~ Deutsch/Sächsisch
    sohc4 said:
    Just my guessing from being a native Bavarian speaker:

    Dra(h)diwaberl: Dreh' dich, Mädchen (Turn, girl)

    Drah=Dreh'
    di=dich
    Waberl=Mädchen

    (Jana might probably know "Waberl" - I remember my mother (of Czech origin) referring to a girl as "Waberl")

    Drahdiwaberl (the band) has their ;) own website: www.drahdiwaberl.at

    An Abbrändler is a farmer who's farm burnt down. See here for a German definition.
    It might get translated as "burnt down person" perhaps.

    Axl

    Ah ja, (ich gehe mal kurz zum Deutschen zurück) dass mit der "Wortauseinandernehmung" ist mir noch gar nicht eingefallen, aber wenn du es mir vorgeschlagen hättest, dann hätte ich die Bedeutung vielleicht eher 'rausgekriegt.

    Wir können ja auf Gaer warten, sodass er uns sagen kann, wie man im Englischen Brandgeschädigte betitelt.
     

    Jana337

    Senior Member
    čeština
    sohc4 said:
    (Jana might probably know "Waberl" - I remember my mother (of Czech origin) referring to a girl as "Waberl")

    Axl

    Hi Axl, sorry, never heard the expression. Sounds very Austrian to me but I cannot decipher any Czech roots.

    Jana
     

    sohc4

    Senior Member
    Germany, German
    whodunit said:
    Ah ja, (ich gehe mal kurz zum Deutschen zurück) dass mit der "Wortauseinandernehmung" ist mir noch gar nicht eingefallen, aber wenn du es mir vorgeschlagen hättest, dann hätte ich die Bedeutung vielleicht eher 'rausgekriegt.
    Mir ist das zuerst selbst auch nicht eingefallen, erst als ich noch mal drüber nachgedacht hatte, und dann habe ich schon den Beitrag geschrieben ;).

    Zu den Guggascheckn gibts auch was im Netz.

    Oh, und http://oewb.retti.info/ hat sogar einige Einträge zu Drahdiwaberl:

    Diesen,
    diesen,
    diesen,
    diesen,
    diesen und
    diesen.

    Ein Drahdiwaberl ist demnach ein drehbares Verkaufsgestell, ein Kreisel, oder ein lebhafter oder ein unbeholfener Mensch.
     

    Whodunit

    Senior Member
    Deutschland ~ Deutsch/Sächsisch
    sohc4 said:
    Mir ist das zuerst selbst auch nicht eingefallen, erst als ich noch mal drüber nachgedacht hatte, und dann habe ich schon den Beitrag geschrieben ;).

    Zu den Guggascheckn gibts auch was im Netz.

    Oh, und http://oewb.retti.info/ hat sogar einige Einträge zu Drahdiwaberl:

    Diesen,
    diesen,
    diesen,
    diesen,
    diesen und
    diesen.

    Ein Drahdiwaberl ist demnach ein drehbares Verkaufsgestell, ein Kreisel, oder ein lebhafter oder ein unbeholfener Mensch.

    Danke schön. Du hättest dir ja nicht die Mühe machen müssen, alle Links aufzuschreiben. Es hätte auch die Homepage gereicht. :D
     

    gaer

    Senior Member
    US-English
    Jana337 said:
    Originally Posted by sohc4
    Jana is absolutely correct. :cross:

    "Jana is absolutely correct" is something almost any English speaker would say, so in the context that Axl wrote it, I have no idea why you marked it as wrong. :confused:

    Gaer
     

    gaer

    Senior Member
    US-English
    sohc4 said:
    An Abbrändler is a farmer who's farm burnt down. See here for a German definition.
    It might get translated as "burnt down person" perhaps.

    Axl
    You lost me here. You guys are talking about words that are not standard, but if you are speaking of someone whose farm has been destroyed by fire, you don't even say that the farm "burnt down". But I'm not sure what phrase would be appropriate.

    You burn down a house, a building, something of that nature. A school. I never thought about this before. I would say:

    The farm was "burnt to the ground", perhaps. You might use this because many crops have some height. Axl, you might wish to ask about this in the English forum though. What do we use refer to someone who OWNS something that is destroyed by a fire, and in particular a farmer? I truly don't know if there is a word for this in Enlgish. :(

    Gaer
     

    Jana337

    Senior Member
    čeština
    gaer said:
    [/i]
    "Jana is absolutely correct" is something almost any English speaker would say, so in the context that Axl wrote it, I have no idea why you marked it as wrong. :confused:

    Gaer

    Oh my, I was absolutely sure that you could say either "someone is right" or "something is correct" but not "someone is correct". I am terribly sorry. :eek:

    Jana
     

    gaer

    Senior Member
    US-English
    Jana337 said:
    Oh my, I was absolutely sure that you could say either "someone is right" or "something is correct" but not "someone is correct". I am terribly sorry. :eek:

    Jana
    Well, right and correct are interchangeable.

    So in this case you weren't correct. :)

    Jana, you MAY be right according to some very conservative grammarian, so don't count yourself wrong yet. But it's SO common to hear:

    "You're absolutely correct."
    "You're absolutely right."

    Both, I think, could be translated with something like : "Du hast ja recht!"

    But in German I'm not sure, ever. :)

    Gaer
     

    Jana337

    Senior Member
    čeština
    gaer said:
    Both, I think, could be translated with something like : "Du hast ja recht!":tick::tick::tick:

    But in German I'm not sure, ever. :)

    Gaer

    You are absolutely right, correct and whatever you want. :)

    Jana
     

    gaer

    Senior Member
    US-English
    Jana337 said:
    Oh, you unreconstructed flagellant! :D

    Jana
    Hey, if I get ONE right, perhaps I can get two right tomorrow, a paragraph in a month. But I think we had better end this, since we have totally drifted from the topic! ;)

    G
     

    sohc4

    Senior Member
    Germany, German
    gaer said:
    You lost me here. You guys are talking about words that are not standard, but if you are speaking of someone whose farm has been destroyed by fire, you don't even say that the farm "burnt down". But I'm not sure what phrase would be appropriate.

    You burn down a house, a building, something of that nature. A school. I never thought about this before. I would say:

    The farm was "burnt to the ground", perhaps. You might use this because many crops have some height. Axl, you might wish to ask about this in the English forum though. What do we use refer to someone who OWNS something that is destroyed by a fire, and in particular a farmer? I truly don't know if there is a word for this in Enlgish. :(

    Gaer
    Yes, I was pretty sure my "translation" would be incorrect. But you are right, I should take this to the English forum (rather than 'at any rate' ;)).

    The Austrian "Abbrändler" IS very specific, I don't even think there is a word for it in (standard) German.

    Axl
     

    Whodunit

    Senior Member
    Deutschland ~ Deutsch/Sächsisch
    sohc4 said:
    The Austrian "Abbrändler" IS very specific, I don't even think there is a word for it in (standard) German.

    Axl

    I also didn't know how to say it in standard German, but what about "Brandgeschädigter"? That sounds strange, because it's not HE who is damaged by fire, but his farm.
     

    sohc4

    Senior Member
    Germany, German
    whodunit said:
    I also didn't know how to say it in standard German, but what about "Brandgeschädigter"? That sounds strange, because it's not HE who is damaged by fire, but his farm.
    Well, but he got the damage. "Brandgeschädigter" would be ok, altough it sounds very bueraucratic ;).

    Axl
     

    gaer

    Senior Member
    US-English
    sohc4 said:
    Yes, I was pretty sure my "translation" would be incorrect. But you are right, I should take this to the English forum (rather than 'at any rate' ;)).

    The Austrian "Abbrändler" IS very specific, I don't even think there is a word for it in (standard) German.

    Axl
    Axl, no need to take this anywhere else unless you want a second opinion, which may be the case. For instance, there may be unusual terms in English that are used in law, for all I know.

    It's very strange, because we have "he bought the farm", meaning that "he died". But nothing (apparently) for someone who has lost the farm because of fire!

    Gaer
     

    gaer

    Senior Member
    US-English
    whodunit said:
    It has to be "Du hast ja Recht!" :D :D :D

    Sorry for bothering. But it was the old spelling ...
    Du hast ja Recht. :)

    Now, how do I say: "Oh no, not again?" (Meaning: oh no, I got caught again by the new rules…) :)

    …schon wieder… :confused:

    Gaer
     

    Whodunit

    Senior Member
    Deutschland ~ Deutsch/Sächsisch
    sohc4 said:
    "Nicht schon wieder!" ;)

    Axl

    But there two meaning for one sentence:

    Nicht schon wieder!

    If you stress "wieder", then you will mean (is the future tense correct here? :cross: ) it was 'again'. E.g.:

    X: "Ich habe 'dass' mit ß geschrieben!"
    Y: "Nicht *schon* wieder!"

    (Y say it because X did it once again and maybe he'll never get it)

    ===

    And if you emphasize "schon", it means that it is really annoying:

    X: "Ich habe 'dass' mit ß geschrieben!"
    Y: "Nicht schon *wieder*!"

    (Y says it because X gets on his nerves.)
     

    gaer

    Senior Member
    US-English
    whodunit said:
    But there two meaning for one sentence:

    Nicht schon wieder!

    If you stress "wieder", then you will mean (is the future tense correct here? :cross: ) it was 'again'. E.g.:
    Future is corrrect.
    X: "Ich habe 'dass' mit ß geschrieben!"
    Y: "Nicht *schon* wieder!"

    (Y say it because X did it once again and maybe he'll never get it)
    Doesn't it also change meaning depending on if you say this to someone else, or about yourself?

    I meant to use it for myself. The context was recth vs. Recht, and I meant:

    Not again? I didn't miss ANOTHER new spelling?

    Like that. :)

    Gaer


    And if you emphasize "schon", it means that it is really annoying:

    X: "Ich habe 'dass' mit ß geschrieben!"
    Y: "Nicht schon *wieder*!"

    (Y says it because X gets on his nerves.)[/QUOTE]
     

    Whodunit

    Senior Member
    Deutschland ~ Deutsch/Sächsisch
    gaer said:
    Future is corrrect.

    I see. It sounds strange, though.

    Doesn't it also change meaning depending on if you say this to someone else, or about yourself?

    I meant to use it for myself. The context was recth vs. Recht, and I meant:

    Not again? I didn't miss ANOTHER new spelling?

    Like that. :)

    Well, I'm not sure if I've already lost you. But if you're speaking about yourself, you'll be able to emphasize them in both variants. It really depends on how much this mistake is getting on your nerves. I'm awaiting the other natives. Don't know what else to say here. Sometimes the accentuations are interchangable.
     

    Apus

    Senior Member
    Confederatio Helvetica French
    sohc4 said:
    Yes, "Buam" is the plural of "Bua", and it means "Boys" and "Boy", respectively.
    Ja, "Buam" ist die Mehrzahl von "Bua" und es bedeutet "Buben", "Jungen", "Knaben" beziehungsweise "Bub", "Junge", Knabe".Axl

    I hope it's all right to revive a (not too old) thread.

    That -m plural really bothers me. I found it a few times in Romance languages and it's regular in Hebrew [thread]Forming plural in Hebrew[/thread].

    My question this time: Do you know of any other examples of -m plural in Austrian or Bavarian dialekts ?
    (or perhaps can you direct me to a German language forum with linguistics specialist ? Would appreciate!)
     

    pixigirl

    New Member
    German, Austria
    Ich überlege noch immer, wo das Wort "Dradiwaberl" (naives Mädchen) herkommt und wie man auf dem Namen "Guckerschecken" (Sommersprossen) kommen kann.

    Drahdiwaberl is from a childs game where the person has to spin first to get dizzy. It comes from "Dreh dich weiberl" Drahdiwaberl is basically being dizzy. "Guckerschecken" is also very simple. Gucker is another word for eyes (Augen) for instance "he has a black eye" "Er hat einen blauen Gucker" and schecken simply means "checkered" for instance the shirt is checkered "Das Hemd ist gescheckert".

    hope this answers your questions.

    Actually it is either "Du hast das Recht" or "Du hast recht". The first would be "that is your right" and "you are right"
     
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    Glockenblume

    Senior Member
    Deutsch (Hochdeutsch und "Frängisch")
    I hope it's all right to revive a (not too old) thread.

    That -m plural really bothers me. I found it a few times in Romance languages and it's regular in Hebrew [thread]Forming plural in Hebrew[/thread].

    My question this time: Do you know of any other examples of -m plural in Austrian or Bavarian dialekts ?
    (or perhaps can you direct me to a German language forum with linguistics specialist ? Would appreciate!)

    The explanation is simple (I know it from my original dialect, Franconian):
    There people say "Bu"/ "Bou" (= Bub) and "Buum"/ "Boum" (= Buben):
    The -m comes from the contraction of the 2nd syllable "-ben" : Buben > Bub'n > Bum. (b+n = m)
     
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