à bientôt ( téléphone et courriels)

stephie7

Member
France Français
Hello,

Comment dit-on "à bientôt" ou "à plus", "à plus tard", "à la prochaine" à la fin d'une conversation téléphonique?
"See you (soon, later...)" se dit plutôt si l'on pense voir bientôt la personne physiquement, non?
Je suis toujours gênée car je ne sais jamais quoi dire avant de raccrocher (à part by-bye!!).

Merci!
 
  • Jean-Michel Carrère

    Senior Member
    French from France
    Are "talk to you later" /"talk to you soon" commonly used in actual fact, though ?

    Am I wrong in believing "Good-bye" the most usual way of ending a telephone conversation ?
     

    Bibi Bardot

    Member
    IRELAND, ENGLISH
    "Goodbye / Bye" is the most common way to end a phonecall, "see ya/ see you soon" is not a very common ending to a telephone conversation, but "talk to you soon/ talk soon/ talk to you later" are all fine. My view is that these are less formal endings to a phonecall, not usually used unless with someone familiar.
     

    Souxie

    Senior Member
    French - France
    Bonjour,

    Comment finir un email envoyé à quelqu'un qui n'est pas proche mais qui pourrait le devenir? Je cherche une formule pour saluer, alors que je ne suis pas sûre qu'on se reverra, c'est un email pour garder le contact, il doit être amical mais sans sentiment.

    See you soon me semble inaproprié
    J'ai lu quelqu'un qui proposait simplement later


    Sinon j'ai pensé ne rien mettre, j'ai déjà reçu des emails comme ça avec une simple signature

    Any suggestions?
     

    LMorland

    Senior Member
    American English
    Bonjour Souxie --

    I used to have this quandary myself, until a person (who wasn't close, but who was potentially in the process of becoming close) signed off with the following closing:

    All the best,

    That was 11 years ago, and I have used it very, very often since. It covers a multitude of relationships! :)
     

    Souxie

    Senior Member
    French - France
    Merci pour vos réponses
    J'ai l'impression que "best" ou "all the best" sont un peu formels pour ma situation, ai-je tort? Je voudrais quelque chose de léger qui soit presque du slang.
    Comment sonne "bye for now"?
     

    aussi martini

    Senior Member
    English - Australia
    Or what about, "hope to talk to you soon"

    ...all the best isn't really that formal by the way, it can be but given the context it wouldn't be taken that way.

    Otherwise, I sometimes say "Cheers"...I don't know if that is just me though :)
     

    Souxie

    Senior Member
    French - France
    Merci, jusque là j'aime bien cheers.
    Je n'utiliserai pas "hope to talk to you soon", puisque rien que le fait d'écrire cet email le prouve, et je ne voudrais pas insister!!
     

    aussi martini

    Senior Member
    English - Australia
    Yep :) I definitely think if you are going for something a little more casual "Cheers" is good...and a little bit vague too if you aren't very close just yet and don't want to sound too intense. lol. Plus, it is something young people say...
     

    wildan1

    Moderando ma non troppo (French-English, CC Mod)
    Yeah, but only the young people who speak British/Antipodean English.

    In the U.S. (don't know about Canada), the word "Cheers" is uttered only when one is clinking glasses of beer! ;)
    Not where I live, LM. We use Cheers, a lot on email closings with friends. But otherwise, yes, only when toasting. And it doesn't mean "thanks" in AE.

    Cheers, wildan1
     

    Souxie

    Senior Member
    French - France
    Je peux apporter une précision concernant ce sujet qui est assez recherché: mes amis anglais finissent leurs emails par une question, une remarque amusante, ou quelque chose d'amical, puis X et prénom, (ou l'inverse) ou seulement initiale du prénom.
     

    BrianT

    New Member
    UK
    English-UK
    You could try 'Regards' (slightly formal), 'Kind Regards' ( less formal), 'Love' (if you know them well), 'xx' also if you know hem well or, if you email them a lot, just the initial of your first name..e.g. B
    Hope this helps
     

    Ann O'Rack

    Senior Member
    UK
    UK English
    I've even seen "br" and "kr" (for "best regards" and "kind regards") but I've always thought them a little sloppy.

    "Bye for now", "have fun", "See ya!" might do the trick, but depends on what you've said in the email itself. If you've sent some information, then "hope it helps" might be ok.
     

    LMorland

    Senior Member
    American English
    Ah, Wildan, you Washingtonians are so international! As for myself, I've only seen "Cheers" as a sign-off on emails from friends from the British Isles.
    Had to report in: a couple of days after I wrote the above, I received an email from a fellow parent at my godson's high school here in California. He's been working with the administration to supervise graduation 'caps and gowns', and he signed off his email to me with "Cheers". I was wryly amused at being proved wrong so soon, and so I told him about this thread, and asked him about his background. Here's his reply:
    Interesting! I rarely use cheers, but so happened to today with you. I am born and bred American, Californian, though I have worked or interacted with Brits at various points in my life in foreign countries (Europe, South America, Africa) and can remember cheers being used by them. [The high-school principal] has written notes with cheers and he is American, though he did live and work in England for a few years.

    hope that helps!
    It seems to me that this person is quite international, and also implies that he may be influenced by our "British-influenced" school principal. In any case, signing off with "cheers" is apparently creeping into American correspondence, if not speech.
     

    aussi martini

    Senior Member
    English - Australia
    Well it is very much a part of the Australian vernacular - and we do tend to take a bit of American english and a bit of British english here...
     

    FCS

    Member
    British English
    Hello. I came across this thread while looking for inspiration to translate "à très bientôt" at the end of an E-letter to potential customers. "A très bientôt" is used in the sense that there will be subsequent E-letters. I'm opting for "Until next time".
     
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