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  1. snowday Member

    Canada English
    Hey guys I think this is a difficult one. There was a phrase I came across earlier that stated that an object was "a l'etage" (sorry for the accents, there should be one on the "a" and the "e"). I don't think it meant upstairs, it was more like the object was in such a position that everyone could see it. Sorry for the lack of context, I can't for the life of me remember the sentence, I just remember that I couldn't really grasp the meaning of the phrase. Any help would be much appreciated. Merci d'avance!
     
  2. Sickduck Senior Member

    Montreal, Quebec (Canada)
    French - Canada
    I'm guessing that ''à l'étage'' means ''on this floor''.
     
  3. zazap Senior Member

    Valencia
    Canada, French and English
    I'd say that "à l'étage" means that it is on the Canadian second floor, which is the equivalent of the European first floor.
     
  4. massie1

    massie1 Senior Member

    Toronto, Ontario, Canada
    Canada, French and English
    Your post mentions:"I don't think it meant upstairs, it was more like the object was in such a position that everyone could see it."

    If that is the case, is it possible that the sentence described the object as being en étalage which would mean that it was on display for everyone to see, as opposed to being à l'étage which would not make a whole lot of sense - a suite or an apartment could be à l'étage, the floor above le rez-de-chaussée (the main floor), but such a description would not apply to an object.

    Hope this helps.
     
  5. snowday Member

    Canada English
    Thanks everyone, I think massie1 may be correct, I was positive it was a l'etage but en etalage seems to make a lot more sense :eek: . In any case, you were all a great help :) .
     

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