à la pelletée

LaLeeRu

Senior Member
USA
English
What does the following expression mean: "Elle y va à la pelletée !" ?

"Prenons une petite minute pour souligner un incroyable bon samaritain local. Elle a fait beaucoup d'effort pour notre société. Elle y va à la pelletée! Allez donc lui envoyer une petite dose d'amour !!!"

Clearly it means that she is really getting involved. However, I was interested in a clearer, more exact definition.

My attempt: She is really digging in?

Thanks,
LaLeeRu
 
Last edited by a moderator:
  • LaLeeRu

    Senior Member
    USA
    English
    Have you heard this expression used in other ways? I ask because I would like to understand what the expression means when it is used here in a newspaper headline: des condos vacants à la pelletée.
     

    Nicomon

    Senior Member
    Français, Québec ♀
    Here it means tons of, gobs of, no end of, unlimited numbers/amounts of,
    I confirm that this is the usual meaning :
    - à la pelletée
    QUÉBEC, FAMILIER – En grand nombre, en grande quantité.
    And that it was correctly used in the article (dated October 2014) I assume that your are referring to : Des condos vacants à la pelletée
    Selon la Société canadienne d’hypothèques et de logement (SCHL), les mises en chantier de condos ont bondi de 36 % dans l’île de Montréal pendant les neuf premiers mois de l’année. Près de 4500 nouvelles unités ont été entamées depuis janvier.
    However « Elle y va à la pelletée », in your first example, is not idiomatic in my opinion. Unless they meant "she puts plenty / tons of effort into ...".
    I for one might have said instead : Elle y met le paquet.
    - mettre le paquet
    FAMILIER, FIGURÉ – Employer tous les moyens disponibles.
    Donner son maximum.
     

    Nicomon

    Senior Member
    Français, Québec ♀
    Similar to en pagaille, said informally in France and Africa.
    Thanks wildan. I learned something new. :)
    I'm not familiar with this figurative sense of « en pagaille », for which the WR dictionary suggests galore, heaps, oodles.
    I only knew the "dishevelled" and "messy" meanings also found on this page.
     
    < Previous | Next >
    Top