à notre réveil

Syagrius

Senior Member
Français. Québec¸Canada.
Bonjour

Voici ma phrase en français pour le contexte :

Vous nous aviez dit que le cauchemar serait terminé à notre réveil.

Et ma traduction anglaise :

You told us that the nightmare would be over as we awake / at our awakening.

Quel est le meilleur équivalent anglais pour "à notre réveil" selon le contexte de ma phrase en français?

Vos suggestions svp.

Merci:).
 
  • Tresley

    Senior Member
    British English
    Hello Syagrius,

    How about:

    'You had told us that the nightmare would end when we woke up'

    BUT, as the nightmare seems to still be going on, I think that 'this nightmare' might sound better in English:

    'You had told us that this nightmare would end when we woke up'

    You decide.

    I hope this helps.
     

    Randisi.

    Senior Member
    American English; USA
    Hi, Tresley.

    Do you really think the "up" is appropriate? To me, it attentuates the force of the verb. But this may be a matter of taste and regional differences.
     

    Tresley

    Senior Member
    British English
    Hi, Tresley.

    Do you really think the "up" is appropriate? To me, it attentuates the force of the verb. But this may be a matter of taste and regional differences.
    Well, it's what I would naturally say and write, but just ending in 'woke' alone is fine too. I never just say 'wake' or 'woke'. I always say 'wake up' and 'woke up'. Perhaps it's regional.
     

    Tresley

    Senior Member
    British English
    Well, 'when we awoke' sounds like 'Oldie Worldie English' to me.

    Having said that, the fact of the matter is that all English-speakers will understand whichever translation is chosen.

    But, speaking personally, I can't think of one expression when I would not use 'up' with 'wake' or 'woke'.

    For example:

    When I woke up the sun was shining
    Wake your mum up is she falls asleep
    I woke up early/late
    The neighbour's car alarm woke me up
    I would like a wake up call at 7am

    Perhaps it's just British English (or just me!) - I don't know.
     

    marget

    Senior Member
    Well, 'when we awoke' sounds like 'Oldie Worldie English' to me.

    Having said that, the fact of the matter is that all English-speakers will understand whichever translation is chosen.

    But, speaking personally, I can't think of one expression when I would not use 'up' with 'wake' or 'woke'.

    For example:

    When I woke up the sun was shining
    Wake your mum up if she falls asleep
    I woke up early/late
    The neighbour's car alarm woke me up
    I would like a wake up call at 7am

    Perhaps it's just British English (or just me!) - I don't know.
    I would use "up" in every example you gave. All I would change is "mum" to "mom" and "neighbour" to "neighbor".:)
     

    Randisi.

    Senior Member
    American English; USA
    When I woke the sun was shining.
    When I awoke the sun was shining.
    Both work for me (as well as "woke up")

    Wake your Mum if she falls asleep (now "Mum," there's a regional difference!)

    I woke early. It was early when I awoke.

    The neighbor's car alarm woke me. (Here I think there may be some difference between "woke me" and "woke me up," perhaps something to do with being woken definitively versus just being woken up in the middle of the night.)

    "Wake up call" always uses the postposition, as far as I know.

    It's amazing the things this forum gets you thinking about!
     
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