é pronto / está pronto

delsey

New Member
Spanish (Spain)
Hello everybody,

I understand that "estar pronto" means "to be ready", but I'd like to know if "pronto" can be combined with "ser" in a sentence like: "Este senhor é muito pronto" and what it would mean in that case.

I ask this because I'm searching for examples of Portuguese adjectives that change their meaning completely depending on if they are combined with "ser" or "estar". For instance, in Spanish, "ser listo" means "to be smart, intelligent" but "estar listo" means "to be ready", and I'd like to know if there are similar examples in Portuguese.

Thank you very much for your help!

Delsey
 
  • Vanda

    Moderesa de Beagá
    Português/ Brasil
    Hello everybody,

    I understand that "estar pronto" means "to be ready", but I'd like to know if "pronto" can be combined with "ser" in a sentence like: "Este senhor é muito pronto" and what it would mean in that case.

    I ask this because I'm searching for examples of Portuguese adjectives that change their meaning completely depending on if they are combined with "ser" or "estar". For instance, in Spanish, "ser listo" means "to be smart, intelligent" but "estar listo" means "to be ready", and I'd like to know if there are similar examples in Portuguese.
    Yes, it is, but not in the case above

    Thank you very much for your help!

    Delsey
    Está feio. (It means something you have made, for example, is ugly). Suppose you have made a decoration in the house and the result is ugly.
    É feio. ( A permanent state. Example: Cursing is ugly (xingar é feio) - a bad habit./ That guy is ugly = aquele rapaz é feio).
     

    Benvindo

    Senior Member
    Brazil, Portuguese
    Pronto as an adjective relating to people can have a number of meanings, among them well disposed (willing to do something) and energetic . If you intend to say that these are inherent, permanent, not transitional attributes of one's personality, you use the verb ser (é), though pronto is not used very often for this, I think.
     
    Last edited:

    TomasCP

    New Member
    Potuguese- Brazil
    Well, i've never heard anybody saying "é pronto" in Brazil. It just doesn´t make sense, because pronto has only one meaning to us ( ready, like in "to be ready", or " ready to start" ). You can say though:
    - ele é preparado ( somebady with a good or satisfactory general instruction )
    - ele está preparado ( someone who has the requisites to do something in special)
    There is a slight change of meaning from the first sentence to the second, a little bit like the examples in spanish you gave.

    I can think of words that change their meaning when used with estar or ser right now, sorry....
     

    anaczz

    Senior Member
    Português (Brasil)
    Antigamente dizia-se:

    Ele é um pronto. (ele não tem dinheiro)

    Há muito tempo não ouço isso.
    Não consigo lembrar nenhuma palavra em português que adquira significado tão diferente com ser/estar, como é o caso do listo em espanhol.
     

    delsey

    New Member
    Spanish (Spain)
    Thanks everyone for your prompt replies!

    I was thinking of another one, because I see that "ser pronto" is not really used... How about "ser apto" / "estar apto"? I have found some examples and I got the impression that "ser apto" might mean "to be apt or appropriate" as in "O seu conteúdo é apto para todas as idades" and "estar apto", "to be capable": "Antes da 37ª semana os pulmões não estão aptos a funcionar em pleno".

    I think if this one doesn't work either I might give up on the idea!

    By the way, all this is for my thesis and, in principle, I'm studying European Portuguese in this case, but all comments from Brazilian speakers are very, very welcome! (I'm just saying it because there might be differences between the two varieties...).

    Thanks agains!
     

    Vanda

    Moderesa de Beagá
    Português/ Brasil
    "ser apto" / "estar apto"
    Ah that is another story! With pronto it doesn't work except for that saying Ana reminded us.
    Ser apto - the person has skills for whatever...
    estar apto - the person has prepared himself and now he/she is ready, has the ability/skill to do whatever....

    A discussion about ser e estar
    http://forum.wordreference.com/showthread.php?t=526353

    another one = http://forum.wordreference.com/showthread.php?t=175450

    another = http://forum.wordreference.com/showthread.php?t=743508
     

    Carfer

    Senior Member
    Portuguese - Portugal
    How about "ser apto" / "estar apto"? I have found some examples and I got the impression that "ser apto" might mean "to be apt or appropriate" as in "O seu conteúdo é apto para todas as idades":tick: and "estar apto", "to be capable": "Antes da 37ª semana os pulmões não estão aptos a funcionar em pleno":tick:.
    You got the right impression. Anyway, in your first sentence, although 'apto' is correct, most people would say 'apropriado' or 'adequado' instead of 'apto'.
     
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