élever de terre

Bonjour,
I can't seem to think of a poetic way of saying "
élevés de terre" in English (Fr > En translation). Is it a French idiomatic way of saying "to build"?

Context: ...seuls la tour Nord et le corps de logis central sont élevés de terre.
 
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  • OLN

    Senior Member
    French - France, ♀


    to build s'applique au bâtisseur.

    build : contruire, bâtir, faire sortir de terre, édifier

    Si le sujet est l'édifice : la tour et le corps logis sortent de terre, surgissent (?)
    s'élèvent (?)
     
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    doinel

    Senior Member
    France French
    Je crois que BrightonNative cherche à traduire ' élevés de terre' en anglais. Toute la phrase est assez bizarre, d'où la confusion. Y-a-t-il quelque chose après? Plus de contexte? Build devrait suffire.
     
    Hello, the title is in French as this is the source language and the source sentence in French is given. The query concerns that particular formulation in French. I have added "Fr > En translation" in my original post. So, maybe "only the tower and ... were erected." ??
     

    Martyn94

    Banned
    English
    I think that it must mean that there were originally plans to build on a more ambitious scale (including for example "la Tour Sud") , but "only XXX and YYY were actually built".
     
    Je crois que BrightonNative cherche à traduire ' élevés de terre' en anglais. Toute la phrase est assez bizarre, d'où la confusion. Y-a-t-il quelque chose après? Plus de contexte? Build devrait suffire.
    Hello, doinel, jetset, petit, alacted, OLN, Martyn and Itisi, thanks for your input. The person had financial difficulties so only a part of the castle was built. Here's the entire sentence. The parts of the castle were built in the Sixteenth Century.
    "Mais de sérieux déboires financiers ne lui laissent d’autres choix que d’interrompre les travaux : seuls la tour Nord, une moitié du corps de logis central et le début de l’aile attenante sont élevés de terre."
    So, it's simply "build" is it?
     

    Martyn94

    Banned
    English
    Hello, doinel, thanks for your input. The person had financial difficulties so only a part of the castle was built. So, it's simply "build" is it?
    Not quite: see post #9, which clashed with yours. Or your post #7, if you want "erected".
     
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    Moon Palace

    Senior Member
    French
    I would suggest : and part of the adjoining wing started being erected / built.
    Thanks to the context you have provided, it is clear the building has not been finished, hence the need to modify the verb. And this is what the French implied: they started rising above the ground, but were not complete.
     

    Martyn94

    Banned
    English
    I would suggest : and part of the adjoining wing started being erected / built.
    Thanks to the context you have provided, it is clear the building has not been finished, hence the need to modify the verb. And this is what the French implied: they started rising above the ground, but were not complete.
    "sont élevés de terre" doesn't particularly imply that these parts weren't finished. But it certainly does imply, to me, that the other parts weren't started. No doubt BrightonNative will have his own view.

    As it seems he does.
     
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    Itisi

    Senior Member
    English UK/French
    If you follow the link provided by petit1 at #6, click on Découvrez Serrant, and then on Historique, you will see that the part in question was built in the Renaissance, and that the rest was added on a century later.
     
    Thanks to Martyn, Itisi, Moon Palace and Jean for your further contributions. Does Brighton Native have her ;) own view? well, I'm open to everyone's opinions. Probably, it would be safest to say that those parts of the castle started to be built - this is fairly ambiguous as it could mean they were completed or left unfinished.
     

    Itisi

    Senior Member
    English UK/French
    Nothing ambiguous about it! :

    " Guillaume de Bautru... décide de poursuivre les travaux selon le plan initial : le corps central est achevé, la tour Sud et les deux ailes sont créées…"
     
    Thanks, Itisi and Gil. So, Itisi, the quote confirms that those parts had not been finished and were completed when Guillaume got his hands on it. However, what had been started is indicated in the French text, une moitié du corps de logis central et le début de l’aile. A thought: how about got off the ground? This could be figurative or literal and is remarkably similar to the French.
    ??
     

    Itisi

    Senior Member
    English UK/French
    It states what was built and what was partly built first time round, and what was completed later, and so it seems to me that it should simply be 'was built'.
     

    Wozzeck

    Senior Member
    French
    Yes

    Basically

    Elever de terre = construire => to build, but the first formula is more poetic, it suggests a dynamic movement towards the sky, and there is something mystic because it suggests a spiritual quest.

    You can make a comparison with the general term Building, and Sky scraper. Sky Scraper means a building which wants to grow up and scrap the sky...
     

    Itisi

    Senior Member
    English UK/French
    but the first formula is more poetic .
    Yes, and I nearly said "although 's'élever de terre' sounds more poetic". Personally, I think it's just a fancy way of saying 'was built', but that is just my opinion, and what's more, I can't think of another way of saying it!
     

    Wozzeck

    Senior Member
    French
    Yes, and I nearly said "although 's'élever de terre' sounds more poetic". Personally, I think it's just a fancy way of saying 'was built', but that is just my opinion, and what's more, I can't think of another way of saying it!

    I don't agree with you... there is a spiritual dimension, and at this time this point was particularly important as the religion was a real concern more than today...

    It depends wether or not sipiritual aspect is important. If you read a french newspaper using this term, I agree with you, you can translate into "to build" because poetry is not the matter, but if you translate a novel, a poem this is a "sacrilège" because I could also say that Shakespeare is globally a fancy...
     

    Itisi

    Senior Member
    English UK/French
    It depends wether or not sipiritual aspect is important. If you read a french newspaper using this term, I agree with you, you can translate into "to build" because poetry is not the matter, but if you translate a novel, a poem this is a "sacrilège"
    But the text here is from a website giving tourist information about the castle, so I think it is not a problem...
     

    Moon Palace

    Senior Member
    French
    Personally, if I read "the beginning / a part of the wing was built", I would understand that the initial aim was to build oniy the beginning / part of the wing. I don't think it went that way. But I won't spend my time and energy on this. I leave it up to Native Brighton to decide.
     
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