Альтернативы масла какао имеют твердую, колющуюся консистенцию

janek

Member
Polish, Poland
Hi everybody,

We have a slight translation problem in here. The context is as follows:

"Альтернативы масла какао имеют твердую, колющуюся консистенцию"

We tried googling, but it didn't reveal any answers.

I will be most obliged for the answer.
 
  • Jana337

    Senior Member
    čeština
    Sounds like brittle but it is a wiiiiiiiiiiiiiiild guess (there is a grammar problem in the word, right?). :)

    Jana
     

    papillon

    Senior Member
    Russian (Ukraine)
    Jana is right:
    kolot`sia is to break (self). (sorry I don`t have cyrillic at this computer...:( )
    So this word does mean brittle, breakable. I don`t see any grammatical problems with the word, although I can`t say I`ve seen it used in this form a lot...
     

    Jana337

    Senior Member
    čeština
    Oooops, sorry. I did not realize that it was the reflexive particle -ся, and I suspected a mistake in the agreement of nouns and adjectives. I should sleep more. :rolleyes:

    Jana
     

    ekhlewagastiR

    Member
    Russian (languages RUS, SWE, ENG, GER, ESP)
    Jana is right:
    kolot`sia is to break (self). (sorry I don`t have cryrillic at this computer...:( )
    So this word does mean brittle, breakable. I don`t see any grammatical problems with the word, although I can`t say I`ve seen it used in this form a lot...

    I neither

    the "grammatical problem" I guess is that

    колющуюся консистенцию (Akkusativ)
    but

    колющаяся консистенция (Nominativ)
     

    Anatoli

    Senior Member
    русский (Russian)
    Jana is right:
    kolot`sia is to break (self). (sorry I don`t have cryrillic at this computer...:( )
    So this word does mean brittle, breakable. I don`t see any grammatical problems with the word, although I can`t say I`ve seen it used in this form a lot...

    I wonder if this is not колоться - "to prick, to sting, to twinge; to inject" rather than its homophone (to be breakable). Can't give 100%, though.

    Ну подумаешь укол, укололся и пошёл :)
     

    papillon

    Senior Member
    Russian (Ukraine)
    I wonder if this is not колоться - "to prick, to sting, to twinge; to inject" rather than its homophone (to be breakable). Can't give 100%, though.
    Ну подумаешь укол, укололся и пошёл :)
    Hmm, this is indeed a possibility. I didn't think about it, because after all, a stinging chocolate?:eek: But, it's true, without more context hard to say.
    A knitted sweater made from rough wool can sometimes колоться, i.e. it pricks the skin and makes it itch.

    Just to take this off-topic (any doubt we would do that ?:D) my favorite meaning for the word колоться is in police/criminal jargon where it means "to spill", used when a criminal either admits the crime, or agrees to implicate others.
    Two cops talking about someone they've been questioning:
    Ну что там, разговорился наш красавец?
    Нет, Иван Федорович, не колется, зараза!
    So, is the pretty boy talking yet?
    No, I.F, he's not spilling
    {he's not admitting to anything)
     

    janek

    Member
    Polish, Poland
    This is certainly the first meaning provided, brittle.

    However, thank you for cheering up my otherwise bleary morning - the idea of a sadist chocolate maker who uses additives to make chocolate sting his customers made me splorf my morning coffee all over the keyboard.

    Papillon, thanks for providing the third meaning! Didn't know this one - I guess Александра Маринина didn't use it in her books ;)
     

    cyanista

    законодательница мод
    NRW
    Belarusian/Russian
    I've just remembered a funny saying: "и хочется, и колется (, и мамка не велит)" that can be translated with the English proverb "all cats love fish but fear to wet their paws". :)
     
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