Выходить vs выйти

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Konstantinos

Senior Member
Greek - Athens
Нам выходить на следующей остановке.

Book of Russian exercises.

I don't understand why выходить is used in this sentence...

Isn't it more natural the выйти since it happens once? One time you get out of the bus or train at a specific station.
 
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  • Awwal12

    Senior Member
    Russian
    Нам выходить на следующей остановке.

    Book of Russian exercises.

    I don't understand why выходить is used in this sentence...

    Isn't it more natural the выйти since it happens once? One time you get out of the bus or train at a specific station.
    It's simply idiomatic. The usage itself is essentially continuous, of course (~~"we have to be gettng out"). You can say "нам нужно выйти на следующей остановке", but in a usual situation it will sound kind of too tense and emphatic, entirely concentrated on the result. Note, however, that you are more expected to use perfectives if you describe sequences of different events which are going to happen in the future (e.g. "нам нужно выйти на следующей остановке, пересесть на кольцевую линию и проехать ещё две остановки").
     
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    Lyutik

    Member
    Russian
    В сочетании с личными местоимениями в дательном падеже в значении "нужно/необходимо/следует что-то делать" употребляются глаголы несовершенного вида.
    We use imperfective verbs in combination with personal pronouns in dative case, meaning "need/necessary/should (to) do sth"

    For example:
    Нам завтра ехать на работу.
    Вам на этой неделе готовиться к экзамену.
    Тебе сегодня покупать продукты.

    Если Вы хотите использовать глагол "выйти" в своем примере, то нужно сказать так:
    If you want to use the perfective verb "выйти" in your example, the correct sentence will be:
    Нам нужно/необходимо/следует выйти на следующей остановке.

    Соответственно, с глаголами совершенного вида мои примеры будут выглядеть так:
    Correspondingly, my examples will be as follows in case we use perfective verbs:
    Нам нужно завтра поехать на работу.
    Вам необходимо на этой неделе подготовиться к экзамену.
    Тебе следует сегодня купить продукты.
     
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    Awwal12

    Senior Member
    Russian
    В сочетании с личными местоимениями в дательном падеже в значении "нужно/необходимо/следует что-то делать" употребляются глаголы несовершенного вида.
    I'd rather say that perfective verbs cannot be used in such construction. Thanks for pointing it out, anyway, I got entirely concentrated on the aspects and failed to mention the syntax (regarding it as somehow obvious, which was wrong).
     

    Jaaguar

    Member
    Estonian
    Isn't it more natural the выйти since it happens once?
    That's the thing with Russian – you learn at school that a completed or one-time action requires совершенный вид (e.g. выйти) and an incomplete or repeated or continuous action requires несовершенный вид (e.g. выходить), and then you keep seeing occasions in Russian-language texts when this principle is (ostensibly) not observed. Like, why is it "Раздевайся!" instead of the logical "Разденься!" (take your clothes off), why is it "Проходите, пожалуйста," instead of the logical "Пройдите, пожалуйста," (inviting the guest to go from the porch of your home into the living room)?

    One Russian woman gave me an example which made many things clearer to me. Maybe it'll be helpful to you, too.

    Imagine that during a class, the teacher says to a misbehaving student: "Иванов, встань и выйди из класса!" ("Ivanov, stand up and leave the classroom!") Now, suppose the boy is taking his time getting up and the teacher gets impatient. Then she might say: "Ну давай, давай, вставай!" ("Come on, come on, get up!")

    The first time, the teacher used совершенный вид, because the emphasis was on the result – to have the student out of the classroom. The second time, the teacher used несовершенный вид, because the emphasis was on the action – the student was supposed to stop wasting time and get a move on.

    To come back to the OP's example, maybe when the Russians talk about getting off the bus at the next stop, they are semi-subconsciously aware that getting out of the bus will not necessarily instantaneous and smooth – there might be people in your way you'll have to make your way past and such. That's why the say "выходить" – "we'll have to undertake the endeavor of reaching the bus door and exiting".

    Another thing to consider is that when Russians ask someone to do something, they often feel that несовершенный вид sounds more polite, more refined. They say "Присаживайтесь," ("have a seat") even though "Присядьте," would confirm better to the general rule in our schoolbooks.

    Those are nuances we the students of Russian will just have to remember.
     

    Awwal12

    Senior Member
    Russian
    That's the thing with Russian – you learn at school that a completed or one-time action requires совершенный вид (e.g. выйти) and an incomplete or repeated or continuous action requires несовершенный вид (e.g. выходить)
    Which is, essentially, correct. Except it cannot be overriden in many grammatical contexts. And sometimes the choice is really idiomatic (much like with the English tenses).
    Because, you see, it can be that simple only as long as we speak about some events which actually occured. Imperatives, on the other hand, presume that we wish somebody to perform something which they still haven't done. And if we are essentially limited to the expressions like ~"be putting it down" and ~"have it put down", why should we choose any of the variants, considering that execution of both commands will normally have the same effect?..

    Such ambiguous situations in grammar tend to produce additional distinctions in these situations, resulting in the usage which doesn't directly follows from the basic aspectual characteristics. In the end some (or all) of the variants may become completely re-grammaticalized (much like it happened with the negated perfective imperatives in Russian, for example; there is nothing particularly perfective about them - they merely describe accidental, undeliberate actions).
     
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