Есть вода vs нет воды

ArtyA

Member
English
Ok, so in the simple sentence, "у мальчиков есть вода" I understand the usage of the word for "water".

However, when this expression is in the negative, "the boys don't have water", "у мальчиков нет воды", the word for "water" changes to "воды".

I am noticing a pattern where the negative and even the interrogative seems to change the form of the noun as well. Is this estimation accurate?




Thanks!

PS I am still looking for a great grammar book. I have found many online. Now it's a matter of just purchasing one. They aren't cheap.
 
  • Maroseika

    Moderator
    Russian
    Please refer to the post in the neighboring thread with the answer to your same question.
    Есть вода - Nominative, вода is the subject.
    Нет воды - Genitive (of Negation), воды is the object, no subject (Impersonal sentence).

    As for the same usage in the interrogative sentences, it is not clear what exactly you mean. Something like Нет ли у вас воды? This is the same Genitive of Negation.
     

    ArtyA

    Member
    English
    Please refer to the post in the neighboring thread with the answer to your same question.
    Есть вода - Nominative, вода is the subject.
    Нет воды - Genitive (of Negation), воды is the object, no subject (Impersonal sentence).

    As for the same usage in the interrogative sentences, it is not clear what exactly you mean. Something like Нет ли у вас воды? This is the same Genitive of Negation.
    Thanks for the response. Yes, my older post touched on something similar but the question is not "the same". As I am learning you will have to excuse my ignorance. So, in my older post I was wondering if the the fact that the word "money" was being quantified made it the genitive case. You did respond and mention that it falls into the genitive of negation. That was quite a helpful response. Thank you for that. However, my question at that time was about a noun being quantified not a negative sentence.

    I think I understand what you are saying though about negation. I will have to research that further. I have been learning Russian for a month now so there is a real lot I don't know. But speaking 3 other languages fluently does help me at least have an idea how grammar can be structured.

    As far as the interrogative, I think I might have figured something out. I noticed that when a question was posed to a person like "Что вы любите делать?" we see that "любите" has the "e" at the end of the word. First of all, this is a verb and not a noun. So, I was off about that. Secondly, I thought that a mere question dictated whether or not the "e" gets put at the end of the word. I am beginning to see that it is when it is addressed in the second person that the "e" gets added.


    Examples:

    Вы любите свою собаку.
    Он любит свою собаку.

    You love your dog.
    He loves his dog.

    So, it is not the noun that is involved and it's not even in the interrogative. It's simply the main verb addressed to someone in the 2nd person. Now I wonder if I am right about that. The "e" gets added at the end of the main verb in the 2nd person.


    Hey thanks for all your answers. I really appreciate the time and effort everyone puts into their responses.
     

    Maroseika

    Moderator
    Russian
    So, it is not the noun that is involved and it's not even in the interrogative... The "e" gets added at the end of the main verb in the 2nd person.
    Yes, you are right, this has nothing to do with the noun, just Russian verbs change in Persons and Numbers.
    Please open a new thread, if you want to ask more about that.
     

    Q-cumber

    Senior Member
    As far as the interrogative, I think I might have figured something out. I noticed that when a question was posed to a person like "Что вы любите делать?" we see that "любите" has the "e" at the end of the word. First of all, this is a verb and not a noun. So, I was off about that. Secondly, I thought that a mere question dictated whether or not the "e" gets put at the end of the word. I am beginning to see that it is when it is addressed in the second person that the "e" gets added.


    Examples:

    Вы любите свою собаку.
    Он любит свою собаку.

    You love your dog.
    He loves his dog.

    So, it is not the noun that is involved and it's not even in the interrogative. It's simply the main verb addressed to someone in the 2nd person. Now I wonder if I am right about that. The "e" gets added at the end of the main verb in the 2nd person.


    Hey thanks for all your answers. I really appreciate the time and effort everyone puts into their responses.
    Please note that there are two ways to address a person in Russian: polite\formal plural "Вы" (quite similar to English "you") and informal singular "ты" ("thou"). In your examples you use the first mode of addressing.

    Что вы любите (plural 2nd person form of любить) делать?
    Вы любите свою собаку.

    Please compare:
    Что ты любишь (singular 2nd person) делать?
    Ты любишь свою собаку.


    Like in English, you can use "вы" mode to address several people at once.
     
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