Лёг и ничего не делаешь.

hermes8825

Member
Italiano
Hello everyone,

I'm having trouble understanding the use of the past perfective
<Moderatorial: unnecessary link deleted>
This is the sentence I need help with:

“Это не просто так, пришёл домой, лёг на диван и ничего не делаешь, собака всё сама сделает“

I understand the point made by this person, i.e. you can't expect to be able to train a dog without making any particular efforts. What I find confusing is the use of past perfective ("пришёл", "лёг") to describe a sequence of hypothetical events, followed by a present imperfective ("ничего не делаешь").

That said, my question is if this is a normal use of verbal aspects and tenses in Russian, even if we limit it to "разговорная речь" or is this turn of phrase, on the contrary, to be considered as simply ungrammatical?

To put it more simply, I, as a non-native speaker, would find it more natural to say something like the following:

“Это не просто так, приходишь домой, ложишься на диван и ничего не делаешь, собака всё сама сделает“

Would there be any problems with this alternative version?

Thanks very much in advance for any help!
 
Last edited by a moderator:
  • Maroseika

    Moderator
    Russian
    This is not ungrammatical, just a turn of speech, widely spread in language. Your variant with all verbs in Present is also quite correct, but with semantic stress on the consequence of "equal" actions. While in the original phrase the stress is rather on the last action (не делаешь) as the result of the previous two completed actions (пришел и лег).
    Of course, this is just a slight nuance.
     

    Vadim K

    Senior Member
    Russian - Russia
    Your version is fine, you can say that way. As for using the past perfective by the person in this case the issue is that the person wanted to desribe two completed actions (идти, ложиться) which she supposed to do before a continuous action (ничего не делать). And as you can probably know we do not have a present perfective in Russian. We only have either a past perfective or a future perfective. So in that situation we use a past perfective for describing a completed action which is done before a continuous action (ничего не делать) . But sure you can use the present imperfective here too.
     

    Vovan

    Senior Member
    Russian
    I, as a non-native speaker, would find it more natural to say something like the following:
    “Это не просто так, приходишь домой, ложишься на диван и ничего не делаешь, собака всё сама сделает“

    Would there be any problems with this alternative version?
    Your version is as possible as the one in the original!
    As for...
    “Это не просто так, пришёл домой, лёг на диван и ничего не делаешь, собака всё сама сделает“
    ...this usage of the past perfective is called "the abstract present":
    2) Прошедшее время глаголов совершенного вида в контексте абстрактного настоящего

    Формы прош. вр. глаголов сов. вида используются для наглядной конкретизации обычного действия. Демонстрируется единичный факт, который представлен так, как будто он уже осуществился, но контекст указывает на то, что такие факты обычны, причем их обычность отнесена к широкому плану настоящего:

    Бывает ведь так: у е х а л человек, которого боялись, он уже не у власти, и тут-то начинается, на ушко: «Вы знаете...»

    (Русская грамматика, М., 1980, том 1)
    (Cross-posted)
     

    Particle

    Member
    Russian-Russia
    “Это не просто так, приходишь домой, ложишься на диван и ничего не делаешь, собака всё сама сделает“

    Would there be any problems with this alternative version?
    No, no problem.

    You can use future tense even:
    Это не просто так, придёшь домой, ляжешь на диван и ничего не будешь делать, собака всё сама сделает.
    Or even so:
    Это не просто так, будешь приходить домой, будешь ложиться на диван и ничего не будешь делать, собака всё сама сделает (будет делать).

    This phrase is like four pictures from a movie. It is important in this phrase, that pictures changed each other correctly.
     
    < Previous | Next >
    Top