Сударь батюшка

jarvisa

Senior Member
England,English
In YouTube video skbBs00H3AY @ 0:49 they sing:

На родимой на сторонке
Сударь батюшка живёт.
Не пускает молоду
Поздно вечером одну

As I understand it, Сударь is a term of address, e.g. ‘sir’ or ‘My lord’, and батюшка is either ‘priest’, ‘dear fellow’ or ‘governor’.
In the context of the song, I assume this translates as:

In the homeland lives my lord governor.
He does not allow his young girl to be alone in the evening.

Is this correct?
 
  • Şafak

    Senior Member
    It's a very tough question.
    Usually батюшка means "a priest" or "a dad". The combination of "cударь" and "батюшка" didn't grate my ears but I can't tell you for sure who this person is. My best guesses are:
    1) Dad,
    2) Priest,
    3) A senior person in the village who's for some reason authorized to decide whether or not these girls can go out alone at night.

    Governor sounds very unlikely.
     
    Last edited:

    Maroseika

    Moderator
    Russian
    It's from "Ах вы,сени, мои сени" and it's father. There are also these words :

    Я не слушала отца,
    Спотешала (тешила) молодца.
     

    Awwal12

    Senior Member
    Russian
    and батюшка is either ‘priest’, ‘dear fellow’ or ‘governor’.
    "Батюшка" is a transparent affective form of "батя" ("dad"). The other meanings and usages (affective/respective "priest"; dated "dear friend") are ultimately derived from it. I sincerely have no idea about "governor" (some sort of contextual misunderstanding?).
    In the main meaning it has a kind of reverent connotation and is fairly dated.
    Welp, I was totally wrong 😁😁.
    The meaning here must be quite apparent from the context, I suppose. At least if you're even basically familiar with the patriarchal rural society of the old times.
     
    Last edited:

    Şafak

    Senior Member
    Ой, никакой ошибки не было. Все верно! Мне показалось, что Маросейка сначала опроверг мои слова.
    Буду спать спокойно. 😁
     

    Enquiring Mind

    Senior Member
    English - the Queen's
    According to the text on this page (source: accordeonworld), her father is strict/overbearing and lacking mercy, and this (грозен) is brought out three times, so perhaps the emotion here is more "fear" than "respect"?
    На родимой на сторонке
    Грозен батюшка живёт.

    Он грозен, сударь, грозен,
    Он не милостивой.

    Perhaps you're working with a different text. These old folk songs often have several different variants.
     

    Awwal12

    Senior Member
    Russian
    I had seen that line but it slipped my mind because I was fixated on the use of ‘cударь’.
    "Су́дарь" is a reduced form of "госуда́рь" and basically means "my lord" (dated). Here it's one of those few cases where it isn't really used as an address.
    What you basically need here is a very respectful expression for one's father.
     

    Sobakus

    Senior Member
    An equivalent translation of this phrase would require finding 1) a folkish historicism form of address to a person of higher rank; 2) a folkish word for 'father' that expresses deference by way of loving familiarity, like calling people other than one's kin 'father, mother, sister, brother' in English but with an inherent connotation of dearness. Unless you can get a 'dear' in there somehow.
     

    Vovan

    Senior Member
    Russian
    I am not sure how best to translate such a respectful form of address for one's own father.
    Just as the Russian "сударь", the English word "sire" used to mean one's lord, master, etc. (and unlike "сударь" it also meant "one's father"!), and could be used vocatively:
    When he said to his father, 'O my sire! why dost thou worship what can neither hear nor see nor avail thee aught' (From The Quran.)

    Note that "сударь" was (and is) sometimes used humourously. ;)
     
    Last edited:

    rae1

    Member
    Russian
    "Батюшка" is a transparent affective form of "батя" ("dad"). The other meanings and usages (affective/respective "priest"; dated "dear friend") are ultimately derived from it. I sincerely have no idea about "governor" (some sort of contextual misunderstanding?).
    I believe "governor" appeared as a possible translation, since 100 - 150 years ago the word was used as a very colloquial form of addressing one's superior (esp. by an uneducated person, like Mr Doolittle when addressing Prof. Higgins) or as a very informal way of referring to one's father, especially by teenage boys or younger men. The latter case, I think, was seen as slang and frowned upon. Сударь батюшка, on the other hand, is very respectful, more like "sir my father", "father and sir".
     

    Romanus73

    New Member
    Russian - Russia
    In YouTube video skbBs00H3AY @ 0:49 they sing:

    На родимой на сторонке
    Сударь батюшка живёт.
    Не пускает молоду
    Поздно вечером одну
    Good day!
    I have listened to and studied a lot of Russian folk song. Unfortunately, you misunderstand some words. Сударь-батюшка here is a respectful and tender form of "father". So my translation is:

    In my homeland (village, town, district etc.)
    [My] dear father lives.
    He does not let [me], a young girl,
    to walk alone late at night...

    I can suggest that further in this song there is a story that the girl violated the prohibition of a caring father, and what came of it.
     
    Last edited:
    Top