Чуть ноги по колено не стер.

brix

Member
français - France
Hi guys,

I'm watching a Russian series on Netflix and I came across this one sentence which leaves me baffled.
Here's a bit of context :

"Все утро с ней провели.
Ну и работка! Чуть ноги по колено не стер."

The person speaking is a policeman, he is addressing the son of a woman he talked to in the morning. The whole series is a (slightly dull) police drama.
I'd be really grateful if someone enlightened on this idiom / turn of phrase involving legs, knees, and rubbing.

Thanks!
 
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  • Enquiring Mind

    Senior Member
    English - the Queen's
    Hi brix. As I understand it: I almost rubbed my legs raw up to the knee = a literal rendering. I'd expect to see this in a context where the speaker had been very busy, running around a lot. Maybe I almost wore my legs to the bone or I almost wore my legs out or I almost ran my legs into the ground or I almost wore my legs down to my knees.
    [But wait for the natives ;).]
     
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    brix

    Member
    français - France
    Hi brix. As I understand it: I almost rubbed my legs raw up to the knee = a literal rendering. I'd expect to see this in a context where the speaker had been very busy, running around a lot. Maybe I almost wore my legs to the bone or I almost wore my legs out.
    [But wait for the natives ;).]
    Thank you for your quick answer. Considering your amount of posts on the forum, I believe your explanation is accurate (plus it totally fits the context).
     

    Awwal12

    Senior Member
    Russian
    Hi brix. As I understand it: I almost rubbed my legs raw up to the knee = a literal rendering. I'd expect to see this in a context where the speaker had been very busy, running around a lot. Maybe I almost wore my legs to the bone or I almost wore my legs out.
    [But wait for the natives ;).]
    Basically so, yes.
     
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