вот и здесь

jester.

Senior Member
Germany -> German
Привет всем! :)

According to my textbook, both вот and здесь mean "here". Is there any difference between them?

I have two sentences in which the words are used and I think I can see a little difference between them:

-А вот моя подруга.
-Что ты здесь делаешь?

It seems to me that in the first sentence вот is used like the French "voilà".
In the second sentence здесь is "implemented" in the sentence like a "real" adverb.

Is this the right distinction or am I on the wrong track?

Thank you in advance.

Пока. :)
 
  • Crescent

    Senior Member
    Russian, (Ukraine)
    No, no.. I think you're more than just on the right track! :) To be honest, being a native, i have never really thought about this..and I just use both words instinctively as I have heard them used plenty of times before. But yes, you're very right to compare the russian 'вот' to the french 'voila!' They do seem to have a similar use in both languages..
    You see, 'вот' - is more like a demonstrative word. It's used when you point at something and say:
    ' А вот и ресторан, который мы искали!'
    ' Boт и мы пришли!' (Nous voila!) :)

    But 'здесь' is really used more frequently to indicate location of places, rather than people (as in the 'Nous voila!' ). So you could say:
    'Здесь раньше была моя школа.'
    'Здесь живет моя лучшая подруга!'
    It can also (I think in most cases) be replaced with ' in this place' - 'на этом месте' .
    Althought, saying - 'на этом метсе живет моя лучшая подруга' does sound a bit odd... :)

    Well, I hope this helps you a little bit. Sorry if my explanation was a bit confusing - I really never think about these things, because of being a native... :)
     

    Crescent

    Senior Member
    Russian, (Ukraine)
    Твое объяснение было очень доброе. Большое спасибо. :)
    Не за что, молодой человек. :) Только не 'доброе' (that means 'kind' - your explanation was very 'kind' hhhm... ;) ) а 'понятное' или 'ясное' или еще можно сказать 'мне все было понятно!'.
     

    jester.

    Senior Member
    Germany -> German
    Не за что, молодой человек. :) Только не 'доброе' (that means 'kind' - your explanation was very 'kind' hhhm... ;) ) а 'понятное' или 'ясное' или еще можно сказать 'мне все было понятно!'.

    Спасибо за совет. :thumbsup: Ты очень любезный. :)
     

    Crescent

    Senior Member
    Russian, (Ukraine)
    Crescent,

    We can also use the word "хорошое объяснение".

    Am I right?

    По-моему, да, так можно сказать! Хотя, не доверяйте моему мнению - я очень часто ошибаюсь. :)
     

    Crescent

    Senior Member
    Russian, (Ukraine)
    Спасибо за совет. :thumbsup: Ты очень любезный. :)

    :) Большое пожалуйста. Толька, я - девушка. (but obviously you didn't know that! :) )Так что - " ты очень любезная". Although, I must warn you - we native Russian speakers don't go around saying "Ты очень любезный." to each other on a normal daily basis. :D At least, not very often..
    It's more common to just hear a ' Спасибо большое за твою/ Вашу помощь.'
    But actually... I don't know... apart from that, how do we thank our fellow life-mates?
     

    cyanista

    законодательница мод
    NRW
    Belarusian/Russian
    Спасибо за совет. :thumbsup: Ты очень любезен(sounds more natural) :)

    In most cases I would translate "вот" as "this".

    А вот моя подруга Вера. - And this is my friend, Vera.

    But I'm afraid, "вот" is not always demonstrative. For example in the following sentence it is "contrastive":

    Я терпеть не могу икру, а вот моя подруга Вера жить без неё не может. - I can't stand caviar but my friend Vera couldn't live without it.

    EDIT: I am the slowest one. :D But don't you think Crescent, that Ты очень любезна is much more common?
     

    cyanista

    законодательница мод
    NRW
    Belarusian/Russian
    Любезен(m) and любезна(f) are short adjectives (краткие прилагательные).

    Moved here.

    By the way Insider, you surely meant to write
    "хорошее объяснение"?
     
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