да пошла ты

antobbo

Senior Member
UK
italian, Italy
hi guys, I was in chat and somebody posted this: да пошла ты
I had a look in the dictionary and it appears that it correspond to our "fuck you".
Now, if memory serves me right пошла is the past of поидти: why did they use the past here rather than the present?
 
  • Rosett

    Senior Member
    Russian
    Here's the subjunctive mood of "идти" ("(да) пошла (бы)") used colloquially in its shortened form as imperative. The full meaning "иди ты на :warning:хуй/dick" is very rude.

    Also, please note that
    пошла is the past of пойти:
     
    Last edited:

    Vadim K

    Senior Member
    Russian - Russia
    It is not exactly the past because this is not indicative at all. It is imperative and imperative does not have tense. But in this case imperative is expressed through subjunctive. Sometimes it happens in Russian. And probably you have already known that subjunctive in Russian is formed with past + бы.
    Originally this phrase sounded like "Да (не) пошла бы ты!". And sometimes colloquially the word "бы" is just omitted. Nowadays you can hear in Russia all three forms of this expression - "Да не пошла бы ты!", "Да пошла бы ты!" and "Да пошла ты!"

    By the way, in my opinion, it is really interesting example how in Russian it can be mixed all three grammatical moods in just one phrase. Here you can find imperative expressed through subjunctive with using the verb form of indicative. :)
     
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    Primomattino

    Member
    Russian - Russia
    hi guys, I was in chat and somebody posted this: да пошла ты
    I had a look in the dictionary and it appears that it correspond to our "fuck you".
    Now, if memory serves me right пошла is the past of поидти: why did they use the past here rather than the present?
    Questa è la ridotta forma del congiuntivo, che in russo è simile alla forma del passato, aggiunta la particella "бы" (il tronco verbo "быть"). Quindi, "Пошла (бы) ты..." (Che tu vada...)
     

    antobbo

    Senior Member
    UK
    italian, Italy
    thanks guys.
    interesting example how in Russian it can be mixed all three grammatical moods in just one phrase. Here you can find imperative expressed through subjunctive with using the verb form of indicative.
    Yes, it is really interesting in fact, but a bit of a nightmare for somebody who's learning the language, as it doesn't seem to be "obeying" a rule as such :)!
     

    Kirill V.

    Senior Member
    Russian
    Yes, I agree with Denis, this makes the imperative somewhat stronger in my view

    Да иди ты! -> Да пошла ты! (rude)
    Да сядь ты на место! -> Да села на место, быстро!
    Ляг на место! -> Легла на место, быстро!

    The latter example was brought to my attention by my son. When he began to go to his kindergarten, one evening he said this with a thoughtful look:
    - You don't say to a girl "ляг!". You should say "легла!"
    Apparently that's what they say to kids when trying to put them in bed after lunch.
     

    Alexander Kuptsov

    New Member
    Russian
    My idea (linguistically it might be imprecise) is that пошла ты is kinda пошла бы ты, with бы being a subjunctive of something like если бы ты пошла отсюда куда-нибудь подальше, было бы лучше. As you see, it's a long sentence which gets emotionally reduces to just 2 or 3 words.
     
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