его нет дома / он не дома

CycloneBill

New Member
French, Spanish (Spain), Portuguese
Hi ребята!

Between его нет дома, and он не дома, I would like to know which of the two is the correct one, and why in the first one the pronoun takes genitive/accusative form instead of nominative.

I'm still learning and I can't really understand the difference.

Спасибо большое всем вам!
 
  • Nickle Sydney

    Senior Member
    Hello.

    Both are correct and mean the same thing.
    I'd say "его нет дома".

    I'm not goot at linguistics, that's why I've not answered your second question. I'm sorry for that.
     
    Last edited:

    CycloneBill

    New Member
    French, Spanish (Spain), Portuguese
    Hey, thanks!

    And is there any reason that makes you choose его нет дома instead of он? Or is it just because you've always said/ heard it that way?

    Sorry for so much questions lol.
     

    ahvalj

    Senior Member
    There is a subltle difference: его нет дома considers the situation from the point of view of the house, i. e. the house is without him; in contrast, он не дома considers his location: he is not home but somewhere else.

    The Genitive is mandatory with the negated form of to be: this is an areal feature of languages of the north-east of Europe (Slavic, Baltic and Baltic-Finnic, the latter use a special case, Partitive).

    Ребята in Russian sounds much more colloquial than in many other languages: one should avoid this way of addressing to unfamiliar people of unknown ages.
     

    Nickle Sydney

    Senior Member
    I don't see any difference.

    - Давай пойдем к Паше.
    - Не, его нет дома / (Не, он не дома).

    I didn't make it up. It's a real conversation that happened 5 minutes ago.:)
     

    ahvalj

    Senior Member
    I don't see any difference.

    - Давай пойдем к Паше.
    - Не, его нет дома / (Не, он не дома).

    I didn't make it up. It's a real conversation that happened 5 minutes ago.:)
    I agree, but this is a casual talk when people do not choose words carefully. Yet, even here we may interpret both variants as emphasizing slightly different things.
     

    henrylee100

    Senior Member
    Russian
    The pronoun in the first one is in the genitive case because it's in the negative, and it's the pattern where you say
    у меня есть машина - > у меня нет машинЫ
    В Москве есть хипстеры -> в Москве нет хипстерОВ
    он дома -> его нет дома (In this last one есть is implied but always omitted in speech and in writing for that matter)
    I honestly don't know why the case changes in the negative but that's how this pattern works in Russain.

    его нет дома - is the standard idiomatic form that you would use if you wanted to say that he's not home.

    он не дома - this one is normally used when you want to imply he is somewhere else and you may know where he is.

    I would say that the first expression is more of a simple statement of fact - he's not home.
    The second one is more like saying he's elsewhere.

    Both are correct. I personally would say that the first one, the one with the genetive, may be a bit more common than the second.
     

    CycloneBill

    New Member
    French, Spanish (Spain), Portuguese
    Ребята in Russian sounds much more colloquial than in many other languages: one should avoid this way of addressing to unfamiliar people of unknown ages.
    Sorry about that, I thought it could be said to pretty much any group of people. Thanks for the advise.

    And thanks a bunch, everybody. All the explanations were clear and I understand it perfectly now :) :thumbsup: .
     

    henrylee100

    Senior Member
    Russian
    Also, regarding ребята - I would say it sounds a bit outdated. You might hear an older person, like a school teacher, addressing a bunch of kids in this way. When I hear this word it makes me think of the old soviet movies for/about children from the 1960s and the 1970s. Hardly anyone uses this form of address in Russia these days.
     

    Словеса

    Senior Member
    Русский
    It is not outdated at all, it is only colloquial. And yes, it is rather mild; some may find mildness of address out of fashion, but not all.
     

    Hyperpolyglot

    Senior Member
    British Official English
    Hi ребята!

    Between его нет дома, and он не дома, I would like to know which of the two is the correct one, and why in the first one the pronoun takes genitive/accusative form instead of nominative.

    I'm still learning and I can't really understand the difference.

    Спасибо большое всем вам!
    I thought ребята is a less common form of noun referring to children, I am sure you are not saying "Hi children" to users here so could ребята also mean friend?
     

    marco_2

    Senior Member
    Polish
    Also, regarding ребята - I would say it sounds a bit outdated. You might hear an older person, like a school teacher, addressing a bunch of kids in this way. When I hear this word it makes me think of the old soviet movies for/about children from the 1960s and the 1970s. Hardly anyone uses this form of address in Russia these days.
    So I got really surprised - how do you address a group of friends now instead of e.g. Пошли, ребята etc.?
     

    Titov222

    New Member
    Russian
    It's absolutely the same

    Hi ребята!

    Between его нет дома, and он не дома, I would like to know which of the two is the correct one, and why in the first one the pronoun takes genitive/accusative form instead of nominative.

    I'm still learning and I can't really understand the difference.

    Спасибо большое всем вам!
     

    Enquiring Mind

    Senior Member
    English - the Queen's
    It's true that you can translate его нет дома and он не дома in the same way - he's not at home. However, they are not necessarily interchangeable in Russian, because of the difference ahvalj pointed out in post 4.
    There is a subtle difference: его нет дома considers the situation from the point of view of the house, i. e. the house is without him; in contrast, он не дома considers his location: he is not home but somewhere else.
    Take this context, for example: "Эд проснулся (...) Не открывая глаз, он начал обследовать место, в котором нашел себя. Мягкое, нежное на ощупь белье — постель. Нет, дома она другая. Черт, он не дома! Не дома!!! Спокойно. Хорошо, он не дома. Он у кого-то в гостях." (source: Адвокат загробного мира, Иван Иванов)

    Его нет дома wouldn't make sense here.
     
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