казалось, что

Interprete

Senior Member
French, France
Hello,

I see that this is translated as 'it seems/seemed as if' in most dictionaries. But can it mean, 'it turned out that'?

Because in my lesson of the day, I have an interview that says:

-Опаздывали ли Вы в школу?
-Бывало. Я жил около школи и поздно выходил из дома - казалось, что успею на урок.

I can't make sense of it if I translate it with 'it seemed that' here...

Thanks!
 
  • Drink

    Senior Member
    English - New England, Russian - Moscow
    I see that this is translated as 'it seems/seemed as if' in most dictionaries. But can it mean, 'it turned out that'?

    Because in my lesson of the day, I have an interview that says:

    -Опаздывали ли Вы в школу?
    -Бывало. Я жил около школы и поздно выходил из дома - казалось, что успею на урок.

    I can't make sense of it if I translate it with 'it seemed that' here...
    No, "seemed" is right. Since he is talking about a repeated past action you can translate it as "I lived near the school and I would leave late, since it would (wrongly) seem that I would be on time."
     

    Interprete

    Senior Member
    French, France
    Thank you, I couldn't get it because I thought успею meant 'i'm hurrying'. It's much clearer now :)
     

    Enquiring Mind

    Senior Member
    English - the Queen's
    The neatest way to render казалось here is "... thinking ...". If something "seems to me", then that's what I think. So I would (or used to) leave home late, thinking I'd (= I would)
    get to school on time
    get to (the) class on time
    be in time for (the) class

    The subject (мне) of казалось (in this impersonal construction) is clearly understood in your sentence. It doesn't need to be stated as "I" am already established as the subject of the sentence.
     

    Rosett

    Senior Member
    Russian
    "Казалось" has no subject in the given example, it reflects a general perception.
     

    Enquiring Mind

    Senior Member
    English - the Queen's
    Who else is there to perceive it? It must logically refer to the subject of the sentence. No-one else knows the circumstances of the action. It could only "seem" to the person speaking and doing the action.
     

    Vovan

    Senior Member
    Russian
    To me, "(to) me" is the object. The subject is the impersonal "it" modified by a clause.
    It seemed (probable/certain) to me that I would make it on time.
    That I would make it on time seemed to me (probable/certain).
     
    Last edited:

    Rosett

    Senior Member
    Russian
    Who else is there to perceive it? It must logically refer to the subject of the sentence. No-one else knows the circumstances of the action. It could only "seem" to the person speaking and doing the action.
    I didn't say it's impersonal here.
    "Казалось" is an introductory word in the OP. But nevertheless, impersonal constructions in Russian have no subject.
    A subject can be found in a different construction, p.ex.: "Само собой казалось, ..."
    Лариса Андреева: «Я просто очень люблю свою работу ...
    17 nov. 2014 - Кто такой Титель мы все на Урале хорошо знаем, но как-то само собой казалось, многолетний художественный руководитель ...
     

    Drink

    Senior Member
    English - New England, Russian - Moscow
    I think Enquiring Mind meant indirect object rather than subject. Here, "казалось" has an implied indirect object of "мне", even though often it can be used without any implied indirect object.
     

    Vovan

    Senior Member
    Russian
    ...even though often it can be used without any implied indirect object.
    I think it can't be the case with "казалось" and all the other similar verbs referring to human experiences. Some indirect object is always implied (even if the author is not fully aware of that). Most common such objects will be: everyone, somebody, every/some living creature, the author, and the majority of (the) people.
     
    Last edited:

    Vovan

    Senior Member
    Russian
    I think Enquiring Mind meant indirect object rather than subject.
    But he said:
    The subject (мне) of казалось (in this impersonal construction) is clearly understood in your sentence.
    Maybe this explains all:
    The neatest way to render казалось here is "... thinking ...".
    If "казалось" is rendered by "was thinking", then "мне" becomes the subject "I":
    I was thinking.
     
    Last edited:

    Q-cumber

    Senior Member
    -Бывало. Я жил около школы и поздно выходил из дома -(мне) казалось, что успею на урок.
    In my opinion, the pronoun is quite necessary here. Otherwise the phrase sounds a bit weird, since the impersonal verb "казалось", being used standalone, drifts away from the "...was thinking.." meaning.
     
    Last edited:
    < Previous | Next >
    Top