нашивать, хаживать и т.д.

clapec

Senior Member
Italian
Привет всем!
Занимаясь русским языкознанием я читала о том, что в словах нашивать, хаживать и т.д. есть оттенок особой длительности и повторяемости действия по сравнению со словами носить и ходить.
К сожалению, я полностью не понимаю, что это такой "оттенок длительности и повторяемости". Вы можете объяснить мне, пожалуйста, значения этих глаголов? И как можно перевести их на английский язык (или на итальянский)?
Большое спасибо!
 
  • cyanista

    законодательница мод
    NRW
    Belarusian/Russian
    Привет всем!
    Занимаясь русским языкознанием, я читала о том, что в словах нашивать, хаживать и т.д. есть оттенок особой длительности и повторяемости действия по сравнению со словами носить и ходить.
    К сожалению, я не полностью понимаю, что такоe "оттенок длительности и повторяемости". Не могли бы вы объяснить мне/Объясните мне, пожалуйста, значения этих глаголов? И как можно перевести их на английский язык (или на итальянский)?
    Большое спасибо!

    Hello, clapec. Your Russian is as always superb!

    These verbs are used to denote a repeated, customary action in the past. However, they sound pretty outdated. You will probably find those in classical literature:

    Настасья сама [каменья] нашивала, помнит, как у нее пальцы затекали, уши болели, шея не могла согреться. (Малахитовая шкатулка, П. П. Бажов)

    - Да вы всегда славились здоровьем, - сказал председатель, - и покойный ваш батюшка был также крепкий человек.
    - Да, на медведя один хаживал, - отвечал Собакевич.(Мертвые души, Н.В. Гоголь)


    I'm not sure about the translation. Rendering this aspect and the stylistical connotations isn't easy! Perhaps, it could be translated as "would + verb"? :confused:
     

    clapec

    Senior Member
    Italian
    Thank you very much for your explanation and your corrections - the meaning of the verbs is much clearer now ;)

    I found on the Internet an English translation of the dialogue from Dead Souls mentioned in your post:

    "Ah, yes; you have always had good health, have you not?" put in the President. "Your late father was equally strong."
    "Yes, he even went out bear hunting alone," replied Sobakevitch.
     

    cyanista

    законодательница мод
    NRW
    Belarusian/Russian
    Thank you very much for your explanation and your corrections - the meaning of the verbs is much clearer now ;) You're always very welcome!

    I found on the Internet an English translation of the dialogue from Dead Souls mentioned in your post:

    "Ah, yes; you have always had good health, have you not?" put in the President. "Your late father was equally strong."
    "Yes, he even went out bear hunting alone," replied Sobakevitch. The translation is pale, to say the least. But as I've already said, it is very hard, probably impossible to convey this colloquial/outdated tone.

    By the way, don't mix нашивать and нашивать! :) The latter means "sew on" and doesn't bear the abovementioned connotations of a repeated action. But you already knew it, didn't you?
     

    clapec

    Senior Member
    Italian
    No, actually I didn't :)
    And when I looked the verb up in a dictionary and found that meaning, I thought that, of course, it couldn't be connected with носить, but I did not notice the difference in the place of the accent! So thank you again ;)
     

    Anevan

    New Member
    USA
    Russian
    Привет всем!
    Занимаясь русским языкознанием я читала о том, что в словах нашивать, хаживать ...И как можно перевести их на английский язык (или на итальянский)?
    Большое спасибо!
    Translate it as:
    I would (past tense) wear/used to wear
    I would (past tense) go/used to go
     
    Top