труд (school subject)

macdevster

Senior Member
USA, English
Hi all - The word труд is defined in WordReference (in the context of a high school subject or class) as Home Economics. On a Quizlet set of flashcards, труд is defined as technology class (or H&C, and I have no idea what that means).

Can someone weigh in on this, please? When a high school student takes труд, what exactly type of class is this?

Thank you!
 
  • Rosett

    Senior Member
    Russian
    First of all, this class used to be based on gender-specific handicraft shops in the high school. Nowadays, it is no longer a strict policy. It is known as "technology (class)," you are correct, of various specialization.
    Schoolgirls can acquire certain important housekeeping skills (cooking, sewing, mending, etc,) schoolboys learn basics of certain mechanic and craft professions, in the joint classes there can be all kinds of drawing, design (other than visual arts,) hand crafting (toys, embroidery,) etc.
     
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    Vovan

    Senior Member
    Russian
    The word труд is...
    "Труд"/"труды́" was short for "трудовое обучение".

    "Труд" was used about one class/lesson, while "труды́" was about two (or more) classes/lessons during the day (like, TIMETABLE: <...>3. Трудов. обуч. 4. Трудов. обуч. <...>). But generally the two words were more or less interchangeable.

    Examples:
    Чем сегодня на трудах занимались, сын?
    Сегодня по труду получил "пятерку".

    "Технология" was coined in the 1990s to replace "трудовое обучение".
     
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    igusarov

    Senior Member
    Russian
    When a high school student takes труд, what exactly type of class is this?
    You can google "кабинет труда" - the pictures would give you a pretty good idea what type of class is it. Generally it is devoted to doing some basic material things manually and teaching related theory.

    Boys:
    using hand tools, using power tools, properties of various materials, wood work, metal work, lathe, threading (screws), milling, soldering.

    Girls:
    properties of fabric, needle work, fabric cutting, sewing machines, properties of various types of food, cooking, etiquette, household chores.

    In country schools they may teach basic agriculture skills, too.
     

    macdevster

    Senior Member
    USA, English
    Thanks! My Uzbek students -- all from Tashkent -- knew what this was right away. Sounds a lot like American educational offerings in the 50s and 60s (I was in middle school in the 70s and there was no longer any separation between boys and girls in these types of classes in my school).
     
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