—Is she your sister?—Yes, it is.

longxianchen

Senior Member
chinese
Hi,
Here are another exercise:
—Is she your sister?
— .
A. Yes, it is.
B. No, he isn't.

I feel the right answer should be Yes, she is, or No, he isn't. But the given answer is A.
Could you please give me some explanations?
Thank you in advance
 
  • dojibear

    Senior Member
    English - Northeast US
    I agree with Keith (post #2). Both A and B are incorrect.

    In a "yes" or "no" reply, you optionally repeat the words from the question. And if you repeat words from the question, the "yes" or "no" is optional:

    Is she your sister?
    - Yes.:tick:
    - No.:tick:
    - (Yes,) she is (my sister).:tick:
    - (No,) she is not (my sister).:tick:

    But you cannot choose other words. You cannot change "she" to "he" or "it".
     

    Lun-14

    Banned
    Hindi
    I agree with Keith (post #2). Both A and B are incorrect.

    In a "yes" or "no" reply, you optionally repeat the words from the question. And if you repeat words from the question, the "yes" or "no" is optional:

    Is she your sister?
    - Yes.:tick:
    - No.:tick:
    - (Yes,) she is (my sister).:tick:
    - (No,) she is not (my sister).:tick:

    But you cannot choose other words. You cannot change "she" to "he" or "it".
    Can I use "it" when the speaker is pointing at the girl's picture, or, when the girl is physically not present at the moment of speaking? i.e.

    A: Is she your sister? (pointing at her picture)
    B: No, it is not.

    A: I met a girl in the supermarket today who resembled you. Is she your sister?
    B: No, it is not.


    Using "it" to refer to a person who's present at the moment of speaking would be rude, I think.
     

    GreenWhiteBlue

    Senior Member
    USA - English
    Can I use "it" when the speaker is pointing at the girl's picture, or, when the girl is physically not present at the moment of speaking? i.e.

    A: Is she your sister? (pointing at her picture)
    B: No, it is not.

    A: I met a girl in the supermarket today who resembled you. Is she your sister?
    B: No, it is not.

    No. In each case the correct pronoun is "she."

    Using "it" to refer to a person who's present at the moment of speaking would be rude, I think.
    The only way the word "it" can work is if you are insisting that your sister is not a human being but is instead an inanimate thing.
     

    Lun-14

    Banned
    Hindi
    "Yes, it is" is an answer to "Is that your sister?"
    Is this correct now?

    A: Is that your sister? (pointing at her picture)
    B: No, it is not.

    A: I met a girl in the supermarket today who resembled you. Is that your sister?
    B: No, it is not.

     

    Lun-14

    Banned
    Hindi
    Thanks, HP.
    (If the sister is present at the moment of speaking)
    A: Is this your sister?
    B: No, it is not.

    I think it would be rude because of both "this" and "it".
    Am I right?
     

    Hermione Golightly

    Senior Member
    British English
    Here is are another exercise:
    —Is she your sister?
    — .
    A. Yes, it is.:cross:
    B. No, he isn't.:cross:
    Hi Longx
    Both A and B are wrong.
    B is wrong because 'he' is a pronoun for males. A sister is female and the pronoun is of course, 'she'.
    A is wrong because we only use it if the question has this or that determiner before the noun.

    -Is that/this your sister/brother?
    -Yes, it is.

    -Is she/he your sister/brother
    -Yes, she/he is.
     

    longxianchen

    Senior Member
    chinese
    Thank you very much. I get it.
    By the way, recently, it's hard for us to visit this forum, because our government almost blocks all the western websites.
     

    Scrawny goat

    Senior Member
    English - Ireland
    Thank you very much. I get it.
    By the way, recently, it's hard for us to visit this forum, because our government almost blocks all the western websites.
    The censors will learn a lot, reading about obscure points of grammar!
    Sorry you find access difficult. It's a shame that anyone puts obstacles in the way of learning.
     
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