‘Dogs are man’s good friend’ or ‘Dogs are man’s good friends’.

brian&me

Senior Member
Chinese - China
Hi everyone,

Would you please tell me if I should say ‘Dogs are man’s good friend’ or ‘Dogs are man’s good friends’.

Thanks a lot in advance.
 
  • goldenband

    Senior Member
    English - American
    The idiom is usually man's best friend:

    Dogs are man's best friend(s).
    The dog is man's best friend.
    A dog is a man's best friend.
    A man's best friend is his dog.

    If I wanted to change the idiom and use "good friend" instead, I'd probably adopt more gender-neutral language as well:

    Dogs are good friends to humankind.

    Or, more likely, I'd add a temporal modifier to make the sentence seem more natural:

    Dogs have been good friends to humankind for thousands of years.
    Dogs have long been a good friend to humankind.
    The dog has always been a good friend to humankind.
     

    DonnyB

    Sixties Mod
    English UK Southern Standard English
    The well-known idiomatic saying is dogs are "man's best friend".

    It's very unwise indeed to try and alter or amend sayings like that: it best it's liable to sound odd, and it could actually give people the impression that you don't know what the correct idiom is. :eek:

    [cross-posted]
     
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