‘Puss’ as a face

gayyyyk

Senior Member
Russian
Hello!
Do people in America use ‘puss’ meaning a face now?
I have found it in a dictionary and encountered an expression ‘sour puss’.
Do you know the origin of the usage ‘puss’ as ‘a face’?
 
  • PaulQ

    Banned
    UK
    English - England
    OED
    Puss:
    Etymology: < Irish pus lip, mouth, now also ‘pout’ (mid 16th cent. or earlier in derogatory use; 14th cent. in pusach having prominent lips), variant of bus, of uncertain origin (apparently related to Gaulish bussu-, probably ‘lip’, attested only in names and derivatives).

    Irish English and slang (chiefly U.S.).

    1. A person's face or mouth.
    1844 Amer. Turf Reg. June 334 He [sc. an Irish fisherman] pointed to where a splendid fish rose and threw himself in sporting style. ‘Be quick, sir, or dat lad will run ahead af you don't put de hook in his puss.’
     

    kentix

    Senior Member
    English - U.S.
    You hear it now and then in the U.S. but not a lot, in my experience.

    It's very likely most common in the phrase sour puss.
     
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