“ Have you ever seen the film?”

will3154

Senior Member
chinese,Harbin
2. “ ______ you ever _______ the film?”
“ Yes, let me tell you something about it.”
A. Did, see B. Will, see C. Have, seen D. Do, see

C is the answer. What about A? I find it sound ok for this situation. Could you you shed some lights on this?:confused:
 
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  • Copyright

    Senior Member
    American English
    I think both A and C are fine. The only light (singular :)) I can shed on this is that there are many tests in China that have multiple correct answers. This is very unfortunate because it just confuses people trying to learn English (and may reflect on their grades).
     

    boozer

    Senior Member
    Bulgarian
    Why, B also sounds fine to me, if you're asking about the intentions of the other person :)

    PS. And grammatically, D should also work, although it would be a weird question :)
     

    LV4-26

    Senior Member
    Why, B also sounds fine to me, if you're asking about the intentions of the other person :)

    PS. And grammatically, D should also work, although it would be a weird question :)
    I suppose the answer to the question "Yes, let me tell you something about it" is meant to eliminate B as a possible option. :)
     

    Hermione Golightly

    Senior Member
    British English
    For me as a BrE speaker and language teacher, it has to be "Have you ever seen the film". This would be a classic test question trap.Buy maybe things have changed in recent years.
    "Did you ever see?" sounds very American to me. There are previous threads about this difference. I can't remember if using the simple past is acceptable or a bit substandard in 'correct' AE.

    I might use the simple past if I was asking about something that can no longer be seen, an exhibition, or a historic or well- known person, Winston Churchill for example.

    "Did you ever see a dinosaur, Grandma?" comes to mind.
    In these tests, the present perfect can't ever be marked wrong.

    Hermione
     

    will3154

    Senior Member
    chinese,Harbin
    I used to be taught by British teachers and glad to follow your lead. I think my doublt about the question is due to the strong American influence in chinese media and I read too much Yahoo.:D
     

    will3154

    Senior Member
    chinese,Harbin
    I think both A and C are fine. The only light (singular :)) I can shed on this is that there are many tests in China that have multiple correct answers. This is very unfortunate because it just confuses people trying to learn English (and may reflect on their grades).
    Thank you Copy and it is nice of you to point out( Is " pointing out:rolleyes:" ok) my mistake. Keep doing that.:thumbsup:
     

    brighthope

    Senior Member
    Japanese
    I suppose the answer to the question "Yes, let me tell you something about it" is meant to eliminate B as a possible option. :)
    I know it would sound like I'm "splitting hairs" (I tend to do this :D),but I think B can be correct.

    A:Hey, The new Henry Porter movie will be out soon. You don't usually like watching movies but You liked the book. Will you ever see the movie?
    B:Yes, let me tell you something about it. I heard this movie will be 3D as a surprise!
    A:No way! That would be cool!

    Something like this. Not possible?

    Yes I was a terrible student for a teacher :p
     
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    newname

    Senior Member
    Vietnamese
    Why, B also sounds fine to me, if you're asking about the intentions of the other person :)

    PS. And grammatically, D should also work, although it would be a weird question :)
    Can you shed more light on why it should ever be weird? Please have a look at this thread http://forum.wordreference.com/showthread.php?t=2023557&highlight=ever

    Do you ever see that film? = Do you occassionally (or even once) see that film?

    I can understand when to use the present perfect or past simple with 'ever'. And now there's this ... I don't know what to say. English is such a weird creature.
     

    Fabulist

    Banned
    American English
    Since the thread title is "Do you ever," we're perhaps getting to the verge of off-topicness to discuss "Do you ever." That acknowledged, "Do you ever <do something>" implies that you have repeated opportunities to do it, and have done it more than once: "Do you ever go to the movies? Yes, but only a couple of times a year." "Do you ever watch <name of weekly TV series>? Yes, every week."

    In reference to a single movie, the movie would have to be shown over a prolonged period of time and still be showing (otherwise, the question would have to be "Did you ever ...), and it would have to be plausible that the recipient of the question would watch it more than once. While that's possible, it's a rare occurrence, so <returning to OP topic> it is much less likely to provoke the response, "Yes, let me tell you something about it" than A or C. In the rare situation in which it was an appropriate question, and the respondent has seen the movie more than once, "Yes, and let me tell you something about it" would be a plausible reply.

    I only just saw this thread. I can't for the life of me see any reason to prefer C to A. If the reason is that Britons don't use construction A, then the exchange should be set in explicitly Britain and students should be advised that that location is important. It's arbitrary and capricious to expect students of the English language in countries where it is not spoken to be exposed only to the British variety, or to exclude American idioms unless a great deal of effort is made to emphasize the differences between the two languages and specifically to exclude the American version.

    I, of course, have no control over what Chinese teachers of English do to their students.
     
    I agree with Fabulist.

    With "ever" in the sentence, the implication is that we're talking about a film from the past - maybe from last year, maybe from the 1930s, but at any rate not a film currently playing in theaters. If we were talking about a movie in current release, we would almost certainly say "have you seen ..." without including "ever." So, dealing with films from the past:

    Did you ever see Citizen Kane?
    Have you ever seen Citizen Kane?


    I can't see why the first is grammatically incorrect. Seeing Citizen Kane would be a single action, already completed in the past at the time of the discussion. Why would the simple past be wrong?

    Perhaps it sounds a bit more casual than the second, and it may not be common usage in BE, but is it really wrong? I'm pretty sure we use the "did" construction often in AE.
     

    boozer

    Senior Member
    Bulgarian
    Can you shed more light on why it should ever be weird? Please have a look at this thread http://forum.wordreference.com/showthread.php?t=2023557&highlight=ever

    Do you ever see that film? = Do you occassionally (or even once) see that film?

    I can understand when to use the present perfect or past simple with 'ever'. And now there's this ... I don't know what to say. English is such a weird creature.
    Fabulist has already explained why it would be a weird question - it takes a very rare set of circumstances that presuppose the asking of such a question.

    That said, I myself have asked it to my brother who now lives in the USA. We both have a thing for Star Wars and have both seen it dozens of times. I still do every now and then. And because I don't know if he has the time to do it, I have asked him whether he ever sees it these days :D
     

    LV4-26

    Senior Member
    [....]
    I only just saw this thread. I can't for the life of me see any reason to prefer C to A. If the reason is that Britons don't use construction A, then the exchange should be set in explicitly Britain and students should be advised that that location is important. It's arbitrary and capricious to expect students of the English language in countries where it is not spoken to be exposed only to the British variety, or to exclude American idioms unless a great deal of effort is made to emphasize the differences between the two languages and specifically to exclude the American version.

    I, of course, have no control over what Chinese teachers of English do to their students.
    Note that HG, the only BE answerer in this thread, said
    In these tests, the present perfect can't ever be marked wrong.
    (emphasis added)
    She never ruled out A completely. From what I understand, she says this is a typical test question and it's meant to prompt answer C. To that, I might just add "...at least when made up by BE teachers".

    It's true that BE speakers will tend to use the present perfect in some cases where AE speakers would more spontaneously go for the simple past. And this is precisely one of those cases.
     
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    LV4-26

    Senior Member
    I agree with Fabulist.

    With "ever" in the sentence, the implication is that we're talking about a film from the past - maybe from last year, maybe from the 1930s, but at any rate not a film currently playing in theaters. If we were talking about a movie in current release, we would almost certainly say "have you seen ..." without including "ever." So, dealing with films from the past:

    Did you ever see Citizen Kane?
    Have you ever seen Citizen Kane?


    I can't see why the first is grammatically incorrect. Seeing Citizen Kane would be a single action, already completed in the past at the time of the discussion. Why would the simple past be wrong?

    Perhaps it sounds a bit more casual than the second, and it may not be common usage in BE, but is it really wrong? I'm pretty sure we use the "did" construction often in AE.
    I wouldn't say the first is incorrect. I'd say their respective meaning is slightly different, at least in the intention.

    Especially dealing with a classic such as Citizen Kane, you'll always get the opportunity to see it one day or another. That's why I would strongly prefer the second version of your sentence.
    PS: I'm a (non native) BE speaker. :)
     

    newname

    Senior Member
    Vietnamese
    In reference to a single movie, the movie would have to be shown over a prolonged period of time and still be showing (otherwise, the question would have to be "Did you ever ...),
    Many thanks, but here's the original post from http://forum.wordreference.com/showthread.php?t=2023557&highlight=ever

    I have seen this sentence in a book."Do people EVER tell you that you have very unusaul ideas about youreself or the world " What does " ever" mean here and what is its function? What will happen if we remove it? I am familiar with the usage if the " ever" in the present perfect tens . eg. Have you ever visited China? but this time it is used in the simple present tense.
    So I can infer from your reply that 'people' are still telling 'you', although they might tell you over a prolonged period of time.
     

    LV4-26

    Senior Member
    I know it would sound like I'm "splitting hairs" (I tend to do this :D),but I think B can be correct.

    A:Hey, The new Henry Porter movie will be out soon. You don't usually like watching movies but You liked the book. Will you ever see the movie?
    B:Yes, let me tell you something about it. I heard this movie will be 3D as a surprise!
    A:No way! That would be cool!

    Something like this. Not possible?

    Yes I was a terrible student for a teacher :p
    Agreed. That only goes to show it's sometimes difficult to make up a test question that can completely rule out all the undesired answers. :)
    Or that tests should include a liminary note reading: you're supposed to give the most likely answer, not to try and "catch me out". :)
     
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